Alcohol outlet density, levels of drinking and alcohol-related harm in New Zealand: A national study

Jennie L. Connor, Kypros Kypri, Melanie L Bell, Kimberly Cousins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Previous research shows associations of geographical density of alcohol outlets with a range of alcohol-related harms. Socioeconomic conditions that are associated with both outlet density and alcohol-related outcomes may confound many studies. We examined the association of outlet density with both consumption and harm throughout New Zealand while controlling for indicators of area deprivation and individual socioeconomic status (SES). Methods: Individual alcohol consumption and drinking consequences were measured in a 2007 national survey of 18e70 year olds (n=1925). All alcohol outlets in New Zealand were geocoded. Outlet density was the number of outlets of each type (off-licences (stores that sell alcoholic beverages for consumption elsewhere), bars, clubs, restaurants) within 1 km of a person's home. We modelled the association of outlet density with total consumption, binge drinking, risky drinking (above New Zealand guidelines) and two measures of effects ('harms' and 'troubles' due to drinking) in the previous year. Logistic regression and zero-inflated Poisson models were used, adjusting for sex, educational level, a deprivation index (NZDep06) and a rurality index. Results: No statistically significant association was seen between outlet density and either average alcohol consumption or risky drinking. Density of off-licences was positively associated with binge drinking, and density of all types of outlet was associated with alcohol-related harm scores, before and after adjustment for SES. Associations of off-licences and clubs with trouble scores were no longer statistically significant in the adjusted analysis. Conclusions: The positive associations seen between alcohol outlet density and both individual level binge drinking and alcohol-related problems appear to be independent of individual and neighbourhood SES. Reducing density of alcohol outlets may reduce alcoholrelated harm among those who live nearby.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)841-846
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Volume65
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011
Externally publishedYes

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New Zealand
Alcohol Drinking
Alcohols
Binge Drinking
Licensure
Social Class
Drinking
Geographic Mapping
Restaurants
Alcoholic Beverages
Logistic Models
Guidelines
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Alcohol outlet density, levels of drinking and alcohol-related harm in New Zealand : A national study. / Connor, Jennie L.; Kypri, Kypros; Bell, Melanie L; Cousins, Kimberly.

In: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, Vol. 65, No. 10, 10.2011, p. 841-846.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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