American Indian and Alaska Native infant and pediatric mortality, United States, 1999-2009

Charlene A. Wong, Francine C Gachupin, Robert C. Holman, Marian F. MacDorman, James E. Cheek, Steve Holve, Rosalyn J. Singleton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives. We described American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) infant and pediatric death rates and leading causes of death. Methods. We adjusted National Vital Statistics System mortality data for AI/AN racial misclassification by linkage with Indian Health Service (IHS) registration records. We determined average annual death rates and leading causes of death for 1999 to 2009 for AI/AN versus White infants and children. We limited the analysis to IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area counties. Results. The AI/AN infant death rate was 914 (rate ratio [RR] = 1.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55, 1.67). Sudden infant death syndrome, unintentional injuries, and influenza or pneumonia were more common in AI/AN versus White infants. The overall AI/AN pediatric death rates were 69.6 for ages 1 to 4 years (RR = 2.56; 95% CI = 2.38, 2.75), 28.9 for ages 5 to 9 years (RR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.92, 2.34), 37.3 for ages 10 to 14 years (RR = 2.22; 95% CI = 2.04, 2.40), and 158.4 for ages 15 to 19 years (RR = 2.71; 95% CI = 2.60, 2.82). Unintentional injuries and suicide occurred at higher rates among AI/AN youths versus White youths. Conclusions. Death rates for AI/AN infants and children were higher than for Whites, with regional disparities. Several leading causes of death in the AI/AN pediatric population are potentially preventable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume104
Issue numberSUPPL. 3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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North American Indians
Infant Mortality
Pediatrics
Confidence Intervals
Mortality
United States Indian Health Service
Cause of Death
Contract Services
Catchment Area (Health)
Alaska Natives
Vital Statistics
Sudden Infant Death
Wounds and Injuries
Information Systems
Suicide
Human Influenza
Pneumonia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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American Indian and Alaska Native infant and pediatric mortality, United States, 1999-2009. / Wong, Charlene A.; Gachupin, Francine C; Holman, Robert C.; MacDorman, Marian F.; Cheek, James E.; Holve, Steve; Singleton, Rosalyn J.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 104, No. SUPPL. 3, 2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wong, Charlene A. ; Gachupin, Francine C ; Holman, Robert C. ; MacDorman, Marian F. ; Cheek, James E. ; Holve, Steve ; Singleton, Rosalyn J. / American Indian and Alaska Native infant and pediatric mortality, United States, 1999-2009. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2014 ; Vol. 104, No. SUPPL. 3.
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abstract = "Objectives. We described American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) infant and pediatric death rates and leading causes of death. Methods. We adjusted National Vital Statistics System mortality data for AI/AN racial misclassification by linkage with Indian Health Service (IHS) registration records. We determined average annual death rates and leading causes of death for 1999 to 2009 for AI/AN versus White infants and children. We limited the analysis to IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area counties. Results. The AI/AN infant death rate was 914 (rate ratio [RR] = 1.61; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 1.55, 1.67). Sudden infant death syndrome, unintentional injuries, and influenza or pneumonia were more common in AI/AN versus White infants. The overall AI/AN pediatric death rates were 69.6 for ages 1 to 4 years (RR = 2.56; 95{\%} CI = 2.38, 2.75), 28.9 for ages 5 to 9 years (RR = 2.12; 95{\%} CI = 1.92, 2.34), 37.3 for ages 10 to 14 years (RR = 2.22; 95{\%} CI = 2.04, 2.40), and 158.4 for ages 15 to 19 years (RR = 2.71; 95{\%} CI = 2.60, 2.82). Unintentional injuries and suicide occurred at higher rates among AI/AN youths versus White youths. Conclusions. Death rates for AI/AN infants and children were higher than for Whites, with regional disparities. Several leading causes of death in the AI/AN pediatric population are potentially preventable.",
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