America's water crisis and what to do about it

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Robert Glennon expresses concern over the depleting water supply in the US, suggesting ways on how to conserve water to meet future requirements for its citizens. Robert believes that modest conservation methods can save a large quantities of water. Another important measure would be to create water-less methods to dispose of human waste. Robert refers to water treatment plants that treat sewer water to potable quality and send it back to homes for consumption. One-third of domestic water use gets flushed in the toilet, causing unnecessary water wastage. Robert asserts that market forces need to play their role in pricing water to encourage conservation and reallocation. The government should participate in the regulation of this water market to protect third parties and environment from degradation. Robert suggests that existing water users should be given rights to specific quantities of water and their rights should be made transferable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)50
Number of pages1
JournalEnvironmental Forum
Volume26
Issue number5
StatePublished - Sep 2009

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water
market
conservation
water use
water supply
role play
water management
pricing
degradation
citizen
regulation
rights
method

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

America's water crisis and what to do about it. / Glennon, Robert J.

In: Environmental Forum, Vol. 26, No. 5, 09.2009, p. 50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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