An adaptable and non-invasive method for tracking Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis 420 in the mouse gut

Marissa A. Lopez-Pier, Matthew P. Koppinger, Preston R. Harris, Danielle K. Cannon, Rinku S. Skaria, Bonnie L. Hurwitz, George Watts, Shravan Aras, Marvin J. Slepian, John P. Konhilas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Probiotic strains from the Bifidobacterium or Lactobacillus genera improve health outcomes in models of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. Yet, underlying mechanisms governing these improved health outcomes are rooted in the interaction of gut microbiota, intestinal interface, and probiotic strain. Central to defining the underlying mechanisms governing these improved health outcomes is the development of adaptable and non-invasive tools to study probiotic localization and colonization within the host gut microbiome. The objective of this study was to test labeling and tracking efficacy of Bifidobacterium animalis subspecies lactis 420 (B420) using a common clinical imaging agent, indocyanine green (ICG). ICG was an effective in situ labeling agent visualized in either intact mouse or excised gastrointestinal (GI) tract at different time intervals. Quantitative PCR was used to validate ICG visualization of B420, which also demonstrated that B420 transit time matched normal murine GI motility (~8 hours). Contrary to previous thoughts, B420 did not colonize any region of the GI tract whether following a single bolus or daily administration for up to 10 days. We conclude that ICG may provide a useful tool to visualize and track probiotic species such as B420 without implementing complex molecular and genetic tools. Proof-of-concept studies indicate that B420 did not colonize and establish residency align the murine GI tract.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106302
JournalJournal of Microbiological Methods
Volume189
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Bifidobacterium animalis lactis subspecies 420
  • Indocyanine green
  • ISOVUE-300
  • Quantitative PCR
  • Translocation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology (medical)

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