An economic exploration of smallholder value chains

Coffee Transactions in Chiapas, Mexico

Fátima Luna, Paul N Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fair trade and vertical integration represent two popular approaches for enhancing the incomes of organized farmers in a volatile coffee market as compared to the uncertain plight of independent, non-affiliated growers. A mixed method approach, utilizing informal interviews and a household survey in Chiapas, Mexico, analyzed three coffee trading regimes: independent, non-affiliated farmers, and growers in cooperatives pursuing a fair trade or vertical integration strategy. Survey and econometric results indicate that concentration on specialty coffee production with a portfolio of foreign contracts is economically preferable to a vertically integrated cooperative, which in turn produces more favorable coffee prices for smallholders than the non-affiliated conventional, coyote-dominated trading system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-106
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Food and Agribusiness Management Review
Volume18
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

vertical integration
Coffee
supply chain
Mexico
cooperatives
growers
Economics
farmers
economics
household surveys
econometrics
Canis latrans
interviews
income
Coyotes
markets
Contracts
Interviews
fair trade
Smallholders

Keywords

  • Chiapas
  • Coffee
  • Fair trade
  • Smallholder agriculture
  • Vertical integration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Business and International Management

Cite this

An economic exploration of smallholder value chains : Coffee Transactions in Chiapas, Mexico. / Luna, Fátima; Wilson, Paul N.

In: International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, Vol. 18, No. 3, 2015, p. 85-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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