An evaluation of DNA-based methodologies for subtyping Salmonella

M. D. Burr, K. L. Josephson, Ian L Pepper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bacteria of the genus Salmonella are major human and animal pathogens worldwide, with over 2000 serotypes. Although most authorities agree that there are only one or two true species of Salmonella, serotypes are accepted as pseudo-species. In addition, although serotype identification is important, without additional subtyping, serotyping has limited usefulness for epidemiology as three serotypes (S. typhimurium, S. enteriditis, and S. heidelberg) account for 50% of human infections worldwide. The purpose of this review is to evaluate different methods of DNA typing and fingerprinting of Salmonella strains and to report the most important epidemiological and phylogenetic discoveries that have been made using these methods. These include plasmid analysis (plasmid profiles and plasmid fingerprints, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprinting). Plasmids are common but not universal in Salmonella isolates and can be used to discriminate isolates through plasmid profiles or restriction digests of plasmid DNA. They have been used with some success to subtype some serotypes. The correlation, however, is not always perfect. RFLP fingerprinting has also been used to subtype serotypes. Specifically, the IS200 insertion sequence has been used to probe restriction digests of chromosomal DNA. Probes derived from 16S sequences have been used similarly in 'ribotyping' studies but with less success. RFLP fingerprinting has been used in both phylogenetic and epidemiology studies of Salmonella and is considered to be a more stable and reliable method than plasmid analysis. PCR fingerprinting techniques, including arbitrarily primed PCR (AP PCR), repetitive sequence (REP) PCR and restriction digests of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA sequences have also been used to discriminate between Salmonella serotypes. The success of PCR methods is variable and depends on specific primers utilized. Overall, many fingerprinting techniques can discriminate between isolates but are often not successful in subtyping serotypes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-323
Number of pages41
JournalCritical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology
Volume28
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Salmonella
Polymerase chain reaction
plasmid
DNA
polymerase chain reaction
methodology
Polymorphism
Epidemiology
polymorphism
epidemiology
probe
phylogenetics
Pathogens
salmonella
evaluation
Bacteria
Animals
pathogen
bacterium
method

Keywords

  • Bacteria
  • Pathogens
  • Pseudo-species
  • Salmonella
  • Serotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

An evaluation of DNA-based methodologies for subtyping Salmonella. / Burr, M. D.; Josephson, K. L.; Pepper, Ian L.

In: Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 28, No. 3, 1998, p. 283-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{6262684b253d4d7db8b3aaa11cf23258,
title = "An evaluation of DNA-based methodologies for subtyping Salmonella",
abstract = "Bacteria of the genus Salmonella are major human and animal pathogens worldwide, with over 2000 serotypes. Although most authorities agree that there are only one or two true species of Salmonella, serotypes are accepted as pseudo-species. In addition, although serotype identification is important, without additional subtyping, serotyping has limited usefulness for epidemiology as three serotypes (S. typhimurium, S. enteriditis, and S. heidelberg) account for 50{\%} of human infections worldwide. The purpose of this review is to evaluate different methods of DNA typing and fingerprinting of Salmonella strains and to report the most important epidemiological and phylogenetic discoveries that have been made using these methods. These include plasmid analysis (plasmid profiles and plasmid fingerprints, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprinting). Plasmids are common but not universal in Salmonella isolates and can be used to discriminate isolates through plasmid profiles or restriction digests of plasmid DNA. They have been used with some success to subtype some serotypes. The correlation, however, is not always perfect. RFLP fingerprinting has also been used to subtype serotypes. Specifically, the IS200 insertion sequence has been used to probe restriction digests of chromosomal DNA. Probes derived from 16S sequences have been used similarly in 'ribotyping' studies but with less success. RFLP fingerprinting has been used in both phylogenetic and epidemiology studies of Salmonella and is considered to be a more stable and reliable method than plasmid analysis. PCR fingerprinting techniques, including arbitrarily primed PCR (AP PCR), repetitive sequence (REP) PCR and restriction digests of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA sequences have also been used to discriminate between Salmonella serotypes. The success of PCR methods is variable and depends on specific primers utilized. Overall, many fingerprinting techniques can discriminate between isolates but are often not successful in subtyping serotypes.",
keywords = "Bacteria, Pathogens, Pseudo-species, Salmonella, Serotypes",
author = "Burr, {M. D.} and Josephson, {K. L.} and Pepper, {Ian L}",
year = "1998",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "28",
pages = "283--323",
journal = "Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology",
issn = "1064-3389",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An evaluation of DNA-based methodologies for subtyping Salmonella

AU - Burr, M. D.

AU - Josephson, K. L.

AU - Pepper, Ian L

PY - 1998

Y1 - 1998

N2 - Bacteria of the genus Salmonella are major human and animal pathogens worldwide, with over 2000 serotypes. Although most authorities agree that there are only one or two true species of Salmonella, serotypes are accepted as pseudo-species. In addition, although serotype identification is important, without additional subtyping, serotyping has limited usefulness for epidemiology as three serotypes (S. typhimurium, S. enteriditis, and S. heidelberg) account for 50% of human infections worldwide. The purpose of this review is to evaluate different methods of DNA typing and fingerprinting of Salmonella strains and to report the most important epidemiological and phylogenetic discoveries that have been made using these methods. These include plasmid analysis (plasmid profiles and plasmid fingerprints, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprinting). Plasmids are common but not universal in Salmonella isolates and can be used to discriminate isolates through plasmid profiles or restriction digests of plasmid DNA. They have been used with some success to subtype some serotypes. The correlation, however, is not always perfect. RFLP fingerprinting has also been used to subtype serotypes. Specifically, the IS200 insertion sequence has been used to probe restriction digests of chromosomal DNA. Probes derived from 16S sequences have been used similarly in 'ribotyping' studies but with less success. RFLP fingerprinting has been used in both phylogenetic and epidemiology studies of Salmonella and is considered to be a more stable and reliable method than plasmid analysis. PCR fingerprinting techniques, including arbitrarily primed PCR (AP PCR), repetitive sequence (REP) PCR and restriction digests of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA sequences have also been used to discriminate between Salmonella serotypes. The success of PCR methods is variable and depends on specific primers utilized. Overall, many fingerprinting techniques can discriminate between isolates but are often not successful in subtyping serotypes.

AB - Bacteria of the genus Salmonella are major human and animal pathogens worldwide, with over 2000 serotypes. Although most authorities agree that there are only one or two true species of Salmonella, serotypes are accepted as pseudo-species. In addition, although serotype identification is important, without additional subtyping, serotyping has limited usefulness for epidemiology as three serotypes (S. typhimurium, S. enteriditis, and S. heidelberg) account for 50% of human infections worldwide. The purpose of this review is to evaluate different methods of DNA typing and fingerprinting of Salmonella strains and to report the most important epidemiological and phylogenetic discoveries that have been made using these methods. These include plasmid analysis (plasmid profiles and plasmid fingerprints, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) fingerprinting). Plasmids are common but not universal in Salmonella isolates and can be used to discriminate isolates through plasmid profiles or restriction digests of plasmid DNA. They have been used with some success to subtype some serotypes. The correlation, however, is not always perfect. RFLP fingerprinting has also been used to subtype serotypes. Specifically, the IS200 insertion sequence has been used to probe restriction digests of chromosomal DNA. Probes derived from 16S sequences have been used similarly in 'ribotyping' studies but with less success. RFLP fingerprinting has been used in both phylogenetic and epidemiology studies of Salmonella and is considered to be a more stable and reliable method than plasmid analysis. PCR fingerprinting techniques, including arbitrarily primed PCR (AP PCR), repetitive sequence (REP) PCR and restriction digests of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA sequences have also been used to discriminate between Salmonella serotypes. The success of PCR methods is variable and depends on specific primers utilized. Overall, many fingerprinting techniques can discriminate between isolates but are often not successful in subtyping serotypes.

KW - Bacteria

KW - Pathogens

KW - Pseudo-species

KW - Salmonella

KW - Serotypes

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031822135&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031822135&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0031822135

VL - 28

SP - 283

EP - 323

JO - Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology

JF - Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology

SN - 1064-3389

IS - 3

ER -