An examination of adapted communication in young children

Jeff Greenberg, Ann E. Suppiger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

In Study 1, children ranging in age from 2 to 6 years were asked to describe one and two object referent sets to one listener who could see the objects and one listener who could not see the objects. The results indicated that all the children gave more information when describing two object referent sets, and that the five- and six-year-olds provided more information (in the form of modifiers) to the listener who could not see the objects than to the listener who could see the objects. In Study 2, children ranging in age from 2 to 4 were asked to describe one object referent set to one listener who could see the objects and one listener who could not, both before and after a questioning session. The questioning session, which was designed to sensitize the children to the range of describable object attributes, clearly led to more informative object descriptions; furthermore, after the questioning session, the three- and four-year-olds manifested a tendency to give more information to the listener who could not see the objects than to the listener who could. The implications of the results of the two studies with regard to the development of adapted communication skills were briefly discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)31-40
Number of pages10
JournalFirst Language
Volume4
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1983

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

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