An experiment on the effects of interruptions on individual work trajectories and performance in critical environments

Suzanne P. Weisband, Kelly J. Fadel, Elisa Mattarelli

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Interruptions are a central characteristic of work in critical environments such as hospitals, airlines, and security agencies. Often, interruptions occur as notifications of some event or circumstance that requires attention. Notifications may be delivered actively as disruptions requiring immediate attention, or passively as unobtrusive background messages. This research hypothesizes that the way notifications are delivered can have an impact on how work unfolds over time, which in turn can affect performance. Based on theories of interruption and observations in an actual operating room, a computer-based role-playing game simulating the scheduling of surgeries in an operating room unit was developed. An experiment was conducted using the game to examine the effects of different types of notification delivery on work trajectories and performance. Results indicate that the way notifications are delivered can indeed influence work trajectories and, consequently, performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 40th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2007, HICSS'07
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
Event40th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2007, HICSS'07 - Big Island, HI, United States
Duration: Jan 3 2007Jan 6 2007

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
ISSN (Print)1530-1605

Other

Other40th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 2007, HICSS'07
CountryUnited States
CityBig Island, HI
Period1/3/071/6/07

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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