An integrated nutrition curriculum in medical education

Cynthia Thomson, Douglas L Taren, Nancy Koff, Mary Marian, Louise Canfield, Tamsen L Bassford, Cheryl Ritenbaugh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

R25 grant support from the NIH/NCI enabled the University of Arizona to assess nutrition education, develop and evaluate specific course content, and move toward comprehensive prevention-based nutrition education in 1991-1997. Hours of nutrition education increased to 115% over baseline, and students indicated greater satisfaction with the amount of nutrition instruction they received. Especially valuable was a course in prenatal and infant nutrition that paired each student with a pregnant patient. After the grant support ended, nutrition began to be crowded out of the curriculum by other, more traditional, topics, but a 57% gain over baseline was sustained. External support for nutrition education is urgently needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)127-129
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Cancer Education
Volume15
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2000

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Medical Education
Curriculum
Education
Organized Financing
Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Thomson, C., Taren, D. L., Koff, N., Marian, M., Canfield, L., Bassford, T. L., & Ritenbaugh, C. (2000). An integrated nutrition curriculum in medical education. Journal of Cancer Education, 15(3), 127-129.

An integrated nutrition curriculum in medical education. / Thomson, Cynthia; Taren, Douglas L; Koff, Nancy; Marian, Mary; Canfield, Louise; Bassford, Tamsen L; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl.

In: Journal of Cancer Education, Vol. 15, No. 3, 09.2000, p. 127-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thomson, C, Taren, DL, Koff, N, Marian, M, Canfield, L, Bassford, TL & Ritenbaugh, C 2000, 'An integrated nutrition curriculum in medical education', Journal of Cancer Education, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. 127-129.
Thomson, Cynthia ; Taren, Douglas L ; Koff, Nancy ; Marian, Mary ; Canfield, Louise ; Bassford, Tamsen L ; Ritenbaugh, Cheryl. / An integrated nutrition curriculum in medical education. In: Journal of Cancer Education. 2000 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. 127-129.
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