An investigation of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility among African American crack cocaine smokers.

M. Williams, Anne Markey Bowen, M. Ross, S. Timpson, U. Pallonen, C. Amos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the unique contribution of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility to the formation of intentions to use male condoms during vaginal sex. Data were collected from 402 male and 157 female heterosexual African American crack cocaine smokers in Houston, Texas, US. Two structural equation models of the intention to use a condom with the last sex partner were estimated. One model included measures of condom-use attitudes, subjective norms and condom-use self-efficacy. A second model included these three measures and a fourth measure of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility. Separate models were estimated for men and women. The addition of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility provided a significantly better fit to the data than did models including only outcome expectations, subjective norms and self-efficacy. Results also showed distinctly different underlying cognitive structures of condom-use intention for men and women. A personal norm of condom-use responsibility had a strong direct effect on men's intentions to use condoms with the last sex partner. Other variables appeared to have no direct effect on men's intentions. Women's intentions were strongly influenced by a personal norm and social subjective norms. Situational self-efficacy and outcome expectations had weaker, yet significant, effects on women's intentions. Given the strong effect of personal norms on men's intentions to use condoms, further research should be undertaken.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)218-227
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Crack Cocaine
Condoms
African Americans
responsibility
self-efficacy
Self Efficacy
cognitive structure
American
structural model
Structural Models
Heterosexuality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

An investigation of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility among African American crack cocaine smokers. / Williams, M.; Bowen, Anne Markey; Ross, M.; Timpson, S.; Pallonen, U.; Amos, C.

In: AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV, Vol. 20, No. 2, 02.2008, p. 218-227.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c516a4fd771243ebb61991765550be4f,
title = "An investigation of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility among African American crack cocaine smokers.",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to investigate the unique contribution of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility to the formation of intentions to use male condoms during vaginal sex. Data were collected from 402 male and 157 female heterosexual African American crack cocaine smokers in Houston, Texas, US. Two structural equation models of the intention to use a condom with the last sex partner were estimated. One model included measures of condom-use attitudes, subjective norms and condom-use self-efficacy. A second model included these three measures and a fourth measure of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility. Separate models were estimated for men and women. The addition of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility provided a significantly better fit to the data than did models including only outcome expectations, subjective norms and self-efficacy. Results also showed distinctly different underlying cognitive structures of condom-use intention for men and women. A personal norm of condom-use responsibility had a strong direct effect on men's intentions to use condoms with the last sex partner. Other variables appeared to have no direct effect on men's intentions. Women's intentions were strongly influenced by a personal norm and social subjective norms. Situational self-efficacy and outcome expectations had weaker, yet significant, effects on women's intentions. Given the strong effect of personal norms on men's intentions to use condoms, further research should be undertaken.",
author = "M. Williams and Bowen, {Anne Markey} and M. Ross and S. Timpson and U. Pallonen and C. Amos",
year = "2008",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1080/09540120701561288",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "20",
pages = "218--227",
journal = "AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV",
issn = "0954-0121",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An investigation of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility among African American crack cocaine smokers.

AU - Williams, M.

AU - Bowen, Anne Markey

AU - Ross, M.

AU - Timpson, S.

AU - Pallonen, U.

AU - Amos, C.

PY - 2008/2

Y1 - 2008/2

N2 - The purpose of this study was to investigate the unique contribution of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility to the formation of intentions to use male condoms during vaginal sex. Data were collected from 402 male and 157 female heterosexual African American crack cocaine smokers in Houston, Texas, US. Two structural equation models of the intention to use a condom with the last sex partner were estimated. One model included measures of condom-use attitudes, subjective norms and condom-use self-efficacy. A second model included these three measures and a fourth measure of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility. Separate models were estimated for men and women. The addition of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility provided a significantly better fit to the data than did models including only outcome expectations, subjective norms and self-efficacy. Results also showed distinctly different underlying cognitive structures of condom-use intention for men and women. A personal norm of condom-use responsibility had a strong direct effect on men's intentions to use condoms with the last sex partner. Other variables appeared to have no direct effect on men's intentions. Women's intentions were strongly influenced by a personal norm and social subjective norms. Situational self-efficacy and outcome expectations had weaker, yet significant, effects on women's intentions. Given the strong effect of personal norms on men's intentions to use condoms, further research should be undertaken.

AB - The purpose of this study was to investigate the unique contribution of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility to the formation of intentions to use male condoms during vaginal sex. Data were collected from 402 male and 157 female heterosexual African American crack cocaine smokers in Houston, Texas, US. Two structural equation models of the intention to use a condom with the last sex partner were estimated. One model included measures of condom-use attitudes, subjective norms and condom-use self-efficacy. A second model included these three measures and a fourth measure of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility. Separate models were estimated for men and women. The addition of a personal norm of condom-use responsibility provided a significantly better fit to the data than did models including only outcome expectations, subjective norms and self-efficacy. Results also showed distinctly different underlying cognitive structures of condom-use intention for men and women. A personal norm of condom-use responsibility had a strong direct effect on men's intentions to use condoms with the last sex partner. Other variables appeared to have no direct effect on men's intentions. Women's intentions were strongly influenced by a personal norm and social subjective norms. Situational self-efficacy and outcome expectations had weaker, yet significant, effects on women's intentions. Given the strong effect of personal norms on men's intentions to use condoms, further research should be undertaken.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=48449100904&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=48449100904&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/09540120701561288

DO - 10.1080/09540120701561288

M3 - Article

C2 - 18293133

AN - SCOPUS:43249117485

VL - 20

SP - 218

EP - 227

JO - AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV

JF - AIDS Care - Psychological and Socio-Medical Aspects of AIDS/HIV

SN - 0954-0121

IS - 2

ER -