An urban grants economy revisited: Corporate charitable contributions in the twin cities, 1979-81, 1987-89

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229 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To examine whether corporate giving had changed during the 1980s, I studied charitable contributions in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota in 1979-81 and 1987-89. There was no support for hypotheses that charitable contributions had decreased, became more tightly coupled to market position, or were less influenced by chief executive officers' social networks. In neither period did the percent of sales to consumers affect contributions; labor intensities had a weak negative effect in 1979-81 and a strong negative effect in 1987-89; and in both periods social network ties to local philanthropic leaders, company performance, and size were positively related to giving, while CEO ownership had a negative effect. Only when firms came under the control of a large outside investor was the effect of network position on contributions significantly weakened.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)445-471
Number of pages27
JournalAdministrative Science Quarterly
Volume42
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 1997
Externally publishedYes

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grant
Sales
Personnel
economy
Industry
social network
labor intensity
market position
investor
sales
leader
firm
Charitable contributions
Economy
performance
Social networks
Social Networks

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Marketing
  • Strategy and Management

Cite this

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