Analyses of brain tumor cell lines confirm a simple model of relationships among fluorescence in situ hybridization, DNA index, and comparative genomic hybridization

Gayatry Mohapatra, Dan H. Moore, Dong H. Kim, Lovedeep Grewal, William C. Hyun, Frederic M. Waldman, Daniel Pinkel, Burt G.F. Feuerstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Several techniques are commonly used for genetic analysis of interphase nuclei. Flow cytometry assays the distribution of DNA content in populations of nuclei stained with a DNA-specific fluorochrome. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) quantifies the number of copies of a specific DNA sequence in single nuclei. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) assess as the relative copy number of DNA sequences throughout a test genome by comparing the signal intensities of test and reference DNA samples hybridized to a template of normal metaphase chromosomes. In principle, there are specific relationships among data obtained from these measurements, and combined measurements should provide a more comprehensive view of the sample that is analyzed. We applied these three techniques to nine brain tumor cell lines and find that a model of CGH that includes unsuppressed repeat sequences describes the data well. We estimate that up to 35% of the fluorescence intensity in well-blocked CGH preparations may not represent unique sequences. Taking these factors into account, our results are, in general, mutually consistent, and highlight issues critical for interpreting CGH preparations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-319
Number of pages9
JournalGenes Chromosomes and Cancer
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1997
Externally publishedYes

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Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Tumor Cell Line
Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization
Brain Neoplasms
DNA
Interphase
Metaphase
Fluorescent Dyes
Flow Cytometry
Chromosomes
Fluorescence
Genome
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Genetics

Cite this

Analyses of brain tumor cell lines confirm a simple model of relationships among fluorescence in situ hybridization, DNA index, and comparative genomic hybridization. / Mohapatra, Gayatry; Moore, Dan H.; Kim, Dong H.; Grewal, Lovedeep; Hyun, William C.; Waldman, Frederic M.; Pinkel, Daniel; Feuerstein, Burt G.F.

In: Genes Chromosomes and Cancer, Vol. 20, No. 4, 12.1997, p. 311-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mohapatra, Gayatry ; Moore, Dan H. ; Kim, Dong H. ; Grewal, Lovedeep ; Hyun, William C. ; Waldman, Frederic M. ; Pinkel, Daniel ; Feuerstein, Burt G.F. / Analyses of brain tumor cell lines confirm a simple model of relationships among fluorescence in situ hybridization, DNA index, and comparative genomic hybridization. In: Genes Chromosomes and Cancer. 1997 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 311-319.
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