Analysis of remotely sensed and surface data of aerosols and meteorology for the Mexico Megalopolis Area between 2003 and 2015

Marco Mora, Rachel A. Braun, Taylor Shingler, Armin Sorooshian

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

Abstract

This paper presents an aerosol characterization study from 2003 to 2015 for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using remotely sensed aerosol data, ground-based measurements, air mass trajectory modeling, aerosol chemical composition modeling, and reanalysis data for the broader Megalopolis of Central Mexico region. The most extensive biomass burning emissions occur between March and May concurrent with the highest aerosol optical depth, ultraviolet aerosol index, and surface particulate matter (PM) mass concentration values. A notable enhancement in coarse PM levels is observed during vehicular rush hour periods on weekdays versus weekends owing to nonengine-related emissions such as resuspended dust. Among wet deposition species measured, PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse (PM10-PM2.5) were best correlated with NH4 +, SO4 2−, and Ca2+, suggesting that the latter three constituents are important components of the aerosol seeding raindrops that eventually deposit to the surface in the study region. Reductions in surface PM mass concentrations were observed in 2014–2015 owing to reduced regional biomass burning as compared to 2003–2013.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages8705-8723
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres
Volume122
Issue number16
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 27 2017

Fingerprint

meteorology
particulate matter
aerosol
analysis
Mexico
particulates
aerosols
Meteorology
Particulate Matter
Aerosols
Biomass
biomass burning
modeling
biomass
Dust
Deposits
Trajectories
Air
Chemical analysis
ground-based measurement

Keywords

  • aerosols
  • fires
  • Mexico City
  • particulate matter
  • remote sensing
  • weekend effect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Oceanography
  • Forestry
  • Ecology
  • Aquatic Science
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Soil Science
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth-Surface Processes
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Palaeontology

Cite this

Analysis of remotely sensed and surface data of aerosols and meteorology for the Mexico Megalopolis Area between 2003 and 2015. / Mora, Marco; Braun, Rachel A.; Shingler, Taylor; Sorooshian, Armin.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 122, No. 16, 27.08.2017, p. 8705-8723.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

@article{22de0d252f5d4457ad24c6670cbebc42,
title = "Analysis of remotely sensed and surface data of aerosols and meteorology for the Mexico Megalopolis Area between 2003 and 2015",
abstract = "This paper presents an aerosol characterization study from 2003 to 2015 for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using remotely sensed aerosol data, ground-based measurements, air mass trajectory modeling, aerosol chemical composition modeling, and reanalysis data for the broader Megalopolis of Central Mexico region. The most extensive biomass burning emissions occur between March and May concurrent with the highest aerosol optical depth, ultraviolet aerosol index, and surface particulate matter (PM) mass concentration values. A notable enhancement in coarse PM levels is observed during vehicular rush hour periods on weekdays versus weekends owing to nonengine-related emissions such as resuspended dust. Among wet deposition species measured, PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse (PM10-PM2.5) were best correlated with NH4 +, SO4 2−, and Ca2+, suggesting that the latter three constituents are important components of the aerosol seeding raindrops that eventually deposit to the surface in the study region. Reductions in surface PM mass concentrations were observed in 2014–2015 owing to reduced regional biomass burning as compared to 2003–2013.",
keywords = "aerosols, fires, Mexico City, particulate matter, remote sensing, weekend effect",
author = "Marco Mora and Braun, {Rachel A.} and Taylor Shingler and Armin Sorooshian",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1002/2017JD026739",
volume = "122",
pages = "8705--8723",
journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research",
issn = "0148-0227",
publisher = "American Geophysical Union",
number = "16",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of remotely sensed and surface data of aerosols and meteorology for the Mexico Megalopolis Area between 2003 and 2015

AU - Mora,Marco

AU - Braun,Rachel A.

AU - Shingler,Taylor

AU - Sorooshian,Armin

PY - 2017/8/27

Y1 - 2017/8/27

N2 - This paper presents an aerosol characterization study from 2003 to 2015 for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using remotely sensed aerosol data, ground-based measurements, air mass trajectory modeling, aerosol chemical composition modeling, and reanalysis data for the broader Megalopolis of Central Mexico region. The most extensive biomass burning emissions occur between March and May concurrent with the highest aerosol optical depth, ultraviolet aerosol index, and surface particulate matter (PM) mass concentration values. A notable enhancement in coarse PM levels is observed during vehicular rush hour periods on weekdays versus weekends owing to nonengine-related emissions such as resuspended dust. Among wet deposition species measured, PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse (PM10-PM2.5) were best correlated with NH4 +, SO4 2−, and Ca2+, suggesting that the latter three constituents are important components of the aerosol seeding raindrops that eventually deposit to the surface in the study region. Reductions in surface PM mass concentrations were observed in 2014–2015 owing to reduced regional biomass burning as compared to 2003–2013.

AB - This paper presents an aerosol characterization study from 2003 to 2015 for the Mexico City Metropolitan Area using remotely sensed aerosol data, ground-based measurements, air mass trajectory modeling, aerosol chemical composition modeling, and reanalysis data for the broader Megalopolis of Central Mexico region. The most extensive biomass burning emissions occur between March and May concurrent with the highest aerosol optical depth, ultraviolet aerosol index, and surface particulate matter (PM) mass concentration values. A notable enhancement in coarse PM levels is observed during vehicular rush hour periods on weekdays versus weekends owing to nonengine-related emissions such as resuspended dust. Among wet deposition species measured, PM2.5, PM10, and PMcoarse (PM10-PM2.5) were best correlated with NH4 +, SO4 2−, and Ca2+, suggesting that the latter three constituents are important components of the aerosol seeding raindrops that eventually deposit to the surface in the study region. Reductions in surface PM mass concentrations were observed in 2014–2015 owing to reduced regional biomass burning as compared to 2003–2013.

KW - aerosols

KW - fires

KW - Mexico City

KW - particulate matter

KW - remote sensing

KW - weekend effect

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85029320800&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85029320800&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/2017JD026739

DO - 10.1002/2017JD026739

M3 - Article

VL - 122

SP - 8705

EP - 8723

JO - Journal of Geophysical Research

T2 - Journal of Geophysical Research

JF - Journal of Geophysical Research

SN - 0148-0227

IS - 16

ER -