Ancestral Asian source(s) of new world Y-chromosome founder haplotypes

Tatiana Karafet, S. L. Zegura, O. Posukh, L. Osipova, A. Bergen, J. Long, D. Goldman, W. Klitz, S. Harihara, P. De Knijff, V. Wiebe, R. C. Griffiths, A. R. Templeton, Michael F Hammer

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Abstract

Haplotypes constructed from Y-chromosome markers were used to trace the origins of Native Americans. Our sample consisted of 2,198 males from 60 global populations, including 19 Native American and 15 indigenous North Asian groups. A set of 12 biallelic polymorphisms gave rise to 14 unique Y-chromosome haplotypes that were unevenly distributed among the populations. Combining multiallelic variation at two Y-linked microsatellites (DYS19 and DXYS156Y) with the unique haplotypes results in a total of 95 combination haplotypes. Contra previous findings based on Y- chromosome data, our new results suggest the possibility of more than one Native American paternal founder haplotype. We postulate that, of the nine unique haplotypes found in Native Americans, haplotypes 1C and 1F are the best candidates for major New World founder haplotypes, whereas haplotypes 1B, 1I, and 1U may either be founder haplotypes and/or have arrived in the New World via recent admixture. Two of the other four haplotypes (YAP+ haplotypes 4 and 5) are probably present because of post-Columbian admixture, whereas haplotype 1G may have originated in the New World, and the Old World source of the final New World haplotype (1D) remains unresolved. The contrasting distribution patterns of the two major candidate founder haplotypes in Asia and the New World, as well as the results of a nested cladistic analysis, suggest the possibility of more than one paternal migration from the general region of Lake Baikal to the Americas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)817-831
Number of pages15
JournalAmerican Journal of Human Genetics
Volume64
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999

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Y Chromosome
Haplotypes
North American Indians
Lakes
Genetic Markers
Microsatellite Repeats
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics

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Ancestral Asian source(s) of new world Y-chromosome founder haplotypes. / Karafet, Tatiana; Zegura, S. L.; Posukh, O.; Osipova, L.; Bergen, A.; Long, J.; Goldman, D.; Klitz, W.; Harihara, S.; De Knijff, P.; Wiebe, V.; Griffiths, R. C.; Templeton, A. R.; Hammer, Michael F.

In: American Journal of Human Genetics, Vol. 64, No. 3, 1999, p. 817-831.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Karafet, T, Zegura, SL, Posukh, O, Osipova, L, Bergen, A, Long, J, Goldman, D, Klitz, W, Harihara, S, De Knijff, P, Wiebe, V, Griffiths, RC, Templeton, AR & Hammer, MF 1999, 'Ancestral Asian source(s) of new world Y-chromosome founder haplotypes', American Journal of Human Genetics, vol. 64, no. 3, pp. 817-831. https://doi.org/10.1086/302282
Karafet, Tatiana ; Zegura, S. L. ; Posukh, O. ; Osipova, L. ; Bergen, A. ; Long, J. ; Goldman, D. ; Klitz, W. ; Harihara, S. ; De Knijff, P. ; Wiebe, V. ; Griffiths, R. C. ; Templeton, A. R. ; Hammer, Michael F. / Ancestral Asian source(s) of new world Y-chromosome founder haplotypes. In: American Journal of Human Genetics. 1999 ; Vol. 64, No. 3. pp. 817-831.
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AU - Zegura, S. L.

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AU - Bergen, A.

AU - Long, J.

AU - Goldman, D.

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