Anhedonia and Perceptual Aberration in First-Episode Psychotic Patients and Their Relatives

Joanna Katsanis, William G. Iacono, Morton Beiser

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Abstract

One hundred eighteen psychiatric patients, each experiencing his or her first lifetime episode of psychosis, 125 of their first-degree relatives, and 155 normal subjects were assessed using the physical anhedonia, social anhedonia, and perceptual aberration scales of Chapman et al. (1976, 1978). We hypothesized that psychotic subjects would obtain higher scores on these scales than their relatives and the controls, and we expected the group of relatives to score more deviantly than the normal controls. The physical anhedonia and social anhedonia scales successfully differentiated the psychiatric patients from the relatives and the latter from the normal subjects. These findings testify to the construct validity of the scales and suggest that they tap a predisposition to psychosis. Unexpectedly, the relatives scored lower on the perceptual aberration scale than did the normal controls, perhaps because the relatives adopted a defensive response set.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)202-206
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume99
Issue number2
StatePublished - May 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Anhedonia
Psychotic Disorders
Psychiatry
Control Groups

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

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Anhedonia and Perceptual Aberration in First-Episode Psychotic Patients and Their Relatives. / Katsanis, Joanna; Iacono, William G.; Beiser, Morton.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 99, No. 2, 05.1990, p. 202-206.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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