Anomalous right coronary artery

Case series and review of literature

Prakash Suryanarayana, Justin Z. Lee, Aiden Abidov, Kapildeo Lotun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Anomalous right coronary arteries (ARCA) are extremely rare in general population. Although mostly asymptomatic and recognized incidentally on cardiac catheterizations, they can be catastrophic and can cause sudden cardiac death. Sudden cardiac deaths are more common when the anomalous vessel runs an inter-arterial course between the aorta and the pulmonary artery. Asymptomatic patients with malignant course of anomalous coronaries can pose clinical dilemmas. Based on prior experience, management of asymptomatic ARCA with malignant course should be subjected to a risk-benefit analysis.This case series begins with a brief description of four separate cases of ARCA. They had their origin in the left coronary sinus or off left anterior descending artery (LAD). Three of them had anterior course between aorta and pulmonary trunk, confirmed by coronary CT angiography (CTA). Whereas two of our patients presented with chronic symptoms, two presented as acute cases with electrocardiographically proven STEMI. These cases were managed differently; by conservative, surgical or interventional approaches. All four cases had good final outcomes. This goes to show how different treatment options can be employed in management of complications associated with anomalous coronary arteries.It is also interesting to note that the radial access provides better guide support that is needed to tackle complex lesions. Many operators have been using radial approach for anomalous coronary interventions. We have successfully employed radial technique after failed trans-femoral attempts and also in STEMI situations. Based on our experience, right radial approach appears to be safer and quicker.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)362-366
Number of pages5
JournalCardiovascular Revascularization Medicine
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Coronary Vessels
Sudden Cardiac Death
Aorta
Coronary Sinus
Cardiac Catheterization
Thigh
Coronary Angiography
Pulmonary Artery
Arteries
Lung
Population
ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Anomalous coronary artery
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention
  • Radial access approach

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Anomalous right coronary artery : Case series and review of literature. / Suryanarayana, Prakash; Lee, Justin Z.; Abidov, Aiden; Lotun, Kapildeo.

In: Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine, Vol. 16, No. 6, 01.09.2015, p. 362-366.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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