Anthropological Contributions to the Development of Culturally Appropriate Tobacco Cessation Programs: A Global Health Priority

Mark Nichter, Mimi Nichter, Siwi Padmawti, C. U. Thresia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

This chapter describes Project QTI, a pioneering attempt to find out what we need to know to successfully carry out tobacco cessation in clinical and community settings. Formative research carried out in India and Indonesia is described. Both countries have high prevalence rates of tobacco use across all social classes, popular indigenous as well as imported tobacco products, few cessation activities, and no established tobacco curriculum in medical schools. A biopolitical model is presented for encouraging systematic assessment of tobacco dependency at the sites of the body, environment, and state. The tobacco control field recognizes the value of transdisciplinary research. The chapter describes Project QTI's ongoing attempts to build a community of tobacco cessation practice that spans both efforts to encourage individuals to quit tobacco use and communities to establish smoke free households and worksites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnthropology and Public Health
Subtitle of host publicationBridging Differences in Culture and Society
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199865390
ISBN (Print)9780195374643
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Keywords

  • Developing countries
  • Formative research
  • Medical anthropology
  • Tobacco cessation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

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    Nichter, M., Nichter, M., Padmawti, S., & Thresia, C. U. (2009). Anthropological Contributions to the Development of Culturally Appropriate Tobacco Cessation Programs: A Global Health Priority. In Anthropology and Public Health: Bridging Differences in Culture and Society Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195374643.003.0012