Anti-immigrant arizona: Ripple effects and mixed immigration status households under “policies of attrition” considered

Anna Ochoa O'Leary, Azucena Sanchez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although the seeds of legislated restrictions for immigrants can be traced to 1994 with California's unsuccessful Prop 187, more recent trends epitomized by Arizona's Senate Bill 1070 signed into law in April 2010 have renewed concerns about the impact of such policies on the life and livelihood of immigrant communities. We argue that in Arizona, emerging anti-immigrant policies that by design single out undocumented immigrants for exclusion grossly neglect important historical and geographical factors that have resulted in the prevalence of mixed immigration status households: domestic units in which the immigration status of at least one member is different from the others. As such, this feature of social organization will make the implementation of such policies untenable.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)115-133
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Borderlands Studies
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Law

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