Anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oils of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) in experimental rheumatoid arthritis

Janet L Funk, Jennifer B. Frye, Janice N. Oyarzo, Jianling Chen, Huaping Zhang, Barbara N. Timmermann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ginger and its extracts have been used traditionally as anti-inflammatory remedies, with a particular focus on the medicinal properties of its phenolic secondary metabolites, the gingerols. Consistent with these uses, potent anti-arthritic effects of gingerol-containing extracts were previously demonstrated by our laboratory using an experimental model of rheumatoid arthritis, streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis. In this study, anti-inflammatory effects of ginger's other secondary metabolites, the essential oils (GEO), which contain terpenes with reported phytoestrogenic activity, were assessed in female Lewis rats with SCW-induced arthritis. GEO (28 mg/kg/d ip) prevented chronic joint inflammation, but altered neither the initial acute phase of joint swelling nor granuloma formation at sites of SCW deposition in liver. Pharmacologic doses of 17-β estradiol (200 or 600 μg/kg/d sc) elicited the same pattern of anti-inflammatory activity, suggesting that GEO could be acting as a phytoestrogen. However, contrary to this hypothesis, GEO had no in vivo effect on classic estrogen target organs, such as uterus or bone. En toto, these results suggest that ginger's anti-inflammatory properties are not limited to the frequently studied phenolics, but may be attributable to the combined effects of both secondary metabolites, the pungent-tasting gingerols and as well as its aromatic essential oils.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-131
Number of pages9
JournalPharmaNutrition
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Fingerprint

Ginger
Zingiber officinale
Experimental Arthritis
rheumatoid arthritis
ginger
arthritis
Volatile Oils
anti-inflammatory activity
secondary metabolites
Rheumatoid Arthritis
essential oils
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
cell walls
Cell Wall
Arthritis
plant estrogens
medicinal properties
Joints
extracts
granuloma

Keywords

  • Arthritis
  • Essential oil
  • Estradiol
  • Ginger
  • Gingerol
  • Mice
  • Phytoestrogen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Pharmacology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oils of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) in experimental rheumatoid arthritis. / Funk, Janet L; Frye, Jennifer B.; Oyarzo, Janice N.; Chen, Jianling; Zhang, Huaping; Timmermann, Barbara N.

In: PharmaNutrition, Vol. 4, No. 3, 01.07.2016, p. 123-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Funk, Janet L ; Frye, Jennifer B. ; Oyarzo, Janice N. ; Chen, Jianling ; Zhang, Huaping ; Timmermann, Barbara N. / Anti-inflammatory effects of the essential oils of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) in experimental rheumatoid arthritis. In: PharmaNutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 4, No. 3. pp. 123-131.
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