Appearance Framing versus Health Framing of Health Advice: Assessing the Effects of a YouTube Channel for Adolescent Girls

Jennifer L Stevens Aubrey, Ashton Gerding Speno, Hilary Gamble

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The present experimental study tested the effects of appearance framing of health advice on adolescent girls’ state self-objectification, appearance anxiety, and preference for appearance-enhancing products. The stimuli consisted of informative YouTube-style videos about doing yoga, drinking water, or using sunscreen, and these videos were either appearance-framed (experimental condition) or health-framed (control condition). In total, 154 adolescent girls (Mage = 15.67, SD = 1.07) participated in the experiment. The effect of appearance-framed videos on state self-objectification scores was moderated by age, such that the effect of viewing the appearance-framed videos positively predicted state self-objectification among the younger adolescents. In addition, self-objectification mediated the effect of condition on appearance anxiety and on their appearance-enhancing product preferences, again with the predicted effects supported for the younger adolescents in the sample.

LanguageEnglish (US)
JournalHealth Communication
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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objectification
Health
Sun hoods
adolescent
video
health
Potable water
Anxiety
Yoga
Sunscreening Agents
anxiety
Drinking Water
Experiments
stimulus
water
present
experiment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Communication

Cite this

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abstract = "The present experimental study tested the effects of appearance framing of health advice on adolescent girls’ state self-objectification, appearance anxiety, and preference for appearance-enhancing products. The stimuli consisted of informative YouTube-style videos about doing yoga, drinking water, or using sunscreen, and these videos were either appearance-framed (experimental condition) or health-framed (control condition). In total, 154 adolescent girls (Mage = 15.67, SD = 1.07) participated in the experiment. The effect of appearance-framed videos on state self-objectification scores was moderated by age, such that the effect of viewing the appearance-framed videos positively predicted state self-objectification among the younger adolescents. In addition, self-objectification mediated the effect of condition on appearance anxiety and on their appearance-enhancing product preferences, again with the predicted effects supported for the younger adolescents in the sample.",
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