Appearance-related communication mediates the link between self-objectification and health and well-being outcomes

Analisa Arroyo, Chris Segrin, Jake Harwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Grounded in objectification theory, the 2 studies presented here predicted that self-objectification is positively related to appearance-related communication (i.e., fat talk and old talk), and, in turn, appearance-related communication is associated with health and well-being outcomes. Results from Study 1, which investigated only fat talk, revealed that fat talk significantly mediated the relationship between self-objectification and body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, bulimia, and self-esteem. Study 2 sought to replicate the findings from Study 1, as well as extend appearance-related communication to old talk. Fat talk was found to mediate the relationships between self-objectification and body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, bulimia, depression, and diet. Old talk significantly mediated the relationships between body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness, and bulimia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)463-482
Number of pages20
JournalHuman Communication Research
Volume40
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Linguistics and Language

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