Application of a profile similarity methodology for identifying terrorist groups that use or pursue CBRN weapons

Ronald L Breiger, Gary A. Ackerman, Victor Asal, David Melamed, H Brinton Milward, R. Karl Rethemeyer, Eric Schoon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

No single profile fits all CBRN-active groups, and therefore it is important to identify multiple profiles. In the analysis of terrorist organizations, linear and generalized regression modeling provide a set of tools to apply to data that is in the form of cases (named groups) by variables (traits and behaviors of the groups). We turn the conventional regression modeling "inside out" to reveal a network of relations among the cases on the basis of their attribute and behavioral similarity. We show that a network of profile similarity among the cases is built in to standard regression modeling, and that the exploitation of this aspect leads to new insights helpful in the identification of multiple profiles for actors. Our application builds on a study of 108 Islamic jihadist organizations that predicts use or pursuit of CBRN weapons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Pages26-33
Number of pages8
Volume6589 LNCS
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Event4th International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling and Prediction, SBP 2011 - College Park, MD, United States
Duration: Mar 29 2011Mar 31 2011

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume6589 LNCS
ISSN (Print)03029743
ISSN (Electronic)16113349

Other

Other4th International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling and Prediction, SBP 2011
CountryUnited States
CityCollege Park, MD
Period3/29/113/31/11

Fingerprint

Methodology
Regression
Modeling
Pursuit
Exploitation
Attribute
Predict
Similarity
Profile
Actors
Form
Standards

Keywords

  • CBRN use or pursuit
  • Networks
  • profile similarity
  • terrorism

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Theoretical Computer Science

Cite this

Breiger, R. L., Ackerman, G. A., Asal, V., Melamed, D., Milward, H. B., Rethemeyer, R. K., & Schoon, E. (2011). Application of a profile similarity methodology for identifying terrorist groups that use or pursue CBRN weapons. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) (Vol. 6589 LNCS, pp. 26-33). (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6589 LNCS). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-19656-0_5

Application of a profile similarity methodology for identifying terrorist groups that use or pursue CBRN weapons. / Breiger, Ronald L; Ackerman, Gary A.; Asal, Victor; Melamed, David; Milward, H Brinton; Rethemeyer, R. Karl; Schoon, Eric.

Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6589 LNCS 2011. p. 26-33 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics); Vol. 6589 LNCS).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Breiger, RL, Ackerman, GA, Asal, V, Melamed, D, Milward, HB, Rethemeyer, RK & Schoon, E 2011, Application of a profile similarity methodology for identifying terrorist groups that use or pursue CBRN weapons. in Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). vol. 6589 LNCS, Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics), vol. 6589 LNCS, pp. 26-33, 4th International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling and Prediction, SBP 2011, College Park, MD, United States, 3/29/11. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-19656-0_5
Breiger RL, Ackerman GA, Asal V, Melamed D, Milward HB, Rethemeyer RK et al. Application of a profile similarity methodology for identifying terrorist groups that use or pursue CBRN weapons. In Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6589 LNCS. 2011. p. 26-33. (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-19656-0_5
Breiger, Ronald L ; Ackerman, Gary A. ; Asal, Victor ; Melamed, David ; Milward, H Brinton ; Rethemeyer, R. Karl ; Schoon, Eric. / Application of a profile similarity methodology for identifying terrorist groups that use or pursue CBRN weapons. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics). Vol. 6589 LNCS 2011. pp. 26-33 (Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)).
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