Applications of adaptive feature-specific imaging

Jun Ke, Pawan K. Baheti, Mark A Neifeld

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Feature-specific imaging (FSI) refers to any imaging system that directly measures linear projections of an object irradiance distribution. Numerous reports of FSI (also called compressive imaging) using static projections can be found in the literature. In this paper we will present adaptive methods of FSI suitable for the applications of (a) image reconstruction and (b) target detection. Adaptive FSI for image reconstruction is based on Principal Component and Hadamard features. The adaptive algorithm employs an updated training set in order to determine the optimal projection vector after each measurement. Adaptive FSI for detection is based on a sequential hypothesis testing framework. The probability of each hypothesis is updated after each measurement and in turn defines a new optimal projection vector. Both of these new adaptive methods will be compared with static FSI. Adaptive FSI for detection will also be compared with conventional imaging.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume6575
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
EventVisual Information Processing XVI - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Apr 10 2007Apr 10 2007

Other

OtherVisual Information Processing XVI
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period4/10/074/10/07

Fingerprint

projection
Imaging techniques
image reconstruction
irradiance
Image reconstruction
education
Adaptive algorithms
Target tracking
Imaging systems
Testing

Keywords

  • Bayes rule
  • Feature-specific imaging
  • Principal component analysis
  • Sequential hypotheses testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Ke, J., Baheti, P. K., & Neifeld, M. A. (2007). Applications of adaptive feature-specific imaging. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (Vol. 6575). [657505] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.720940

Applications of adaptive feature-specific imaging. / Ke, Jun; Baheti, Pawan K.; Neifeld, Mark A.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 6575 2007. 657505.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ke, J, Baheti, PK & Neifeld, MA 2007, Applications of adaptive feature-specific imaging. in Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. vol. 6575, 657505, Visual Information Processing XVI, Orlando, FL, United States, 4/10/07. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.720940
Ke J, Baheti PK, Neifeld MA. Applications of adaptive feature-specific imaging. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 6575. 2007. 657505 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.720940
Ke, Jun ; Baheti, Pawan K. ; Neifeld, Mark A. / Applications of adaptive feature-specific imaging. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. Vol. 6575 2007.
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