Applying a social meaning model to relational message interpretations of conversational involvement: Comparing observer and participant perspectives

Judee K Burgoon, Deborah A. Newton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This investigation explored observer interpretations of relational messages associated with nonverbal conversational involvement and cross‐validated observer interpretations with those provided by participants. Observers each rated five 2‐minute videotaped segments from interactions in which untrained confederates greatly increased or decreased involvement. High involvement, and the specific nonverbal cue complexes associated with it, conveyed greater intimacy (immediacy, affection, receptivity, trust, and depth), composure/relaxation, equality/similarity, dominance, and formality than low involvement. Observers showed high consistency among themselves in their interpretations and some correspondence with participants, a finding which offers qualified support for a social meaning model (i.e., that there are consensually recognized meanings for behavior). However, participants showed a positivity bias, assigning more favorable interpretations on average than did observers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)96-113
Number of pages18
JournalSouthern Communication Journal
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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interpretation
sympathy
intimacy
equality
trend
interaction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication

Cite this

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