Arctic environmental change of the last four centuries

Jonathan Overpeck, K. Hughen, D. Hardy, R. Bradley, R. Case, M. Douglas, B. Finney, K. Gajewski, G. Jacoby, A. Jennings, S. Lamoureux, A. Lasca, G. MacDonald, J. Moore, M. Retelle, S. Smith, A. Wolfe, G. Zielinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

767 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A compilation of paleoclimate records from lake sediments, trees, glaciers, and marine sediments provides a view of circum-Arctic environmental variability over the last 400 years. From 1840 to the mid-20th century, the Arctic warmed to the highest temperatures in four centuries. This warming ended the Little Ice Age in the Arctic and has caused retreats of glaciers, melting of permafrost and sea ice, and alteration of terrestrial and lake ecosystems. Although warming, particularly after 1920, was likely caused by increases in atmospheric trace gases, the initiation of the warming in the mid-19th century suggests that increased solar irradiance, decreased volcanic activity, and feedbacks internal to the climate system played roles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1251-1256
Number of pages6
JournalScience
Volume278
Issue number5341
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 14 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

environmental change
warming
glacier
lake ecosystem
atmospheric gas
Little Ice Age
trace gas
terrestrial ecosystem
paleoclimate
permafrost
marine sediment
irradiance
lacustrine deposit
sea ice
melting
climate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Overpeck, J., Hughen, K., Hardy, D., Bradley, R., Case, R., Douglas, M., ... Zielinski, G. (1997). Arctic environmental change of the last four centuries. Science, 278(5341), 1251-1256. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.278.5341.1251

Arctic environmental change of the last four centuries. / Overpeck, Jonathan; Hughen, K.; Hardy, D.; Bradley, R.; Case, R.; Douglas, M.; Finney, B.; Gajewski, K.; Jacoby, G.; Jennings, A.; Lamoureux, S.; Lasca, A.; MacDonald, G.; Moore, J.; Retelle, M.; Smith, S.; Wolfe, A.; Zielinski, G.

In: Science, Vol. 278, No. 5341, 14.11.1997, p. 1251-1256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Overpeck, J, Hughen, K, Hardy, D, Bradley, R, Case, R, Douglas, M, Finney, B, Gajewski, K, Jacoby, G, Jennings, A, Lamoureux, S, Lasca, A, MacDonald, G, Moore, J, Retelle, M, Smith, S, Wolfe, A & Zielinski, G 1997, 'Arctic environmental change of the last four centuries', Science, vol. 278, no. 5341, pp. 1251-1256. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.278.5341.1251
Overpeck J, Hughen K, Hardy D, Bradley R, Case R, Douglas M et al. Arctic environmental change of the last four centuries. Science. 1997 Nov 14;278(5341):1251-1256. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.278.5341.1251
Overpeck, Jonathan ; Hughen, K. ; Hardy, D. ; Bradley, R. ; Case, R. ; Douglas, M. ; Finney, B. ; Gajewski, K. ; Jacoby, G. ; Jennings, A. ; Lamoureux, S. ; Lasca, A. ; MacDonald, G. ; Moore, J. ; Retelle, M. ; Smith, S. ; Wolfe, A. ; Zielinski, G. / Arctic environmental change of the last four centuries. In: Science. 1997 ; Vol. 278, No. 5341. pp. 1251-1256.
@article{ac6f8e2245f34b3da879c6752e5dd44e,
title = "Arctic environmental change of the last four centuries",
abstract = "A compilation of paleoclimate records from lake sediments, trees, glaciers, and marine sediments provides a view of circum-Arctic environmental variability over the last 400 years. From 1840 to the mid-20th century, the Arctic warmed to the highest temperatures in four centuries. This warming ended the Little Ice Age in the Arctic and has caused retreats of glaciers, melting of permafrost and sea ice, and alteration of terrestrial and lake ecosystems. Although warming, particularly after 1920, was likely caused by increases in atmospheric trace gases, the initiation of the warming in the mid-19th century suggests that increased solar irradiance, decreased volcanic activity, and feedbacks internal to the climate system played roles.",
author = "Jonathan Overpeck and K. Hughen and D. Hardy and R. Bradley and R. Case and M. Douglas and B. Finney and K. Gajewski and G. Jacoby and A. Jennings and S. Lamoureux and A. Lasca and G. MacDonald and J. Moore and M. Retelle and S. Smith and A. Wolfe and G. Zielinski",
year = "1997",
month = "11",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1126/science.278.5341.1251",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "278",
pages = "1251--1256",
journal = "Science",
issn = "0036-8075",
publisher = "American Association for the Advancement of Science",
number = "5341",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arctic environmental change of the last four centuries

AU - Overpeck, Jonathan

AU - Hughen, K.

AU - Hardy, D.

AU - Bradley, R.

AU - Case, R.

AU - Douglas, M.

AU - Finney, B.

AU - Gajewski, K.

AU - Jacoby, G.

AU - Jennings, A.

AU - Lamoureux, S.

AU - Lasca, A.

AU - MacDonald, G.

AU - Moore, J.

AU - Retelle, M.

AU - Smith, S.

AU - Wolfe, A.

AU - Zielinski, G.

PY - 1997/11/14

Y1 - 1997/11/14

N2 - A compilation of paleoclimate records from lake sediments, trees, glaciers, and marine sediments provides a view of circum-Arctic environmental variability over the last 400 years. From 1840 to the mid-20th century, the Arctic warmed to the highest temperatures in four centuries. This warming ended the Little Ice Age in the Arctic and has caused retreats of glaciers, melting of permafrost and sea ice, and alteration of terrestrial and lake ecosystems. Although warming, particularly after 1920, was likely caused by increases in atmospheric trace gases, the initiation of the warming in the mid-19th century suggests that increased solar irradiance, decreased volcanic activity, and feedbacks internal to the climate system played roles.

AB - A compilation of paleoclimate records from lake sediments, trees, glaciers, and marine sediments provides a view of circum-Arctic environmental variability over the last 400 years. From 1840 to the mid-20th century, the Arctic warmed to the highest temperatures in four centuries. This warming ended the Little Ice Age in the Arctic and has caused retreats of glaciers, melting of permafrost and sea ice, and alteration of terrestrial and lake ecosystems. Although warming, particularly after 1920, was likely caused by increases in atmospheric trace gases, the initiation of the warming in the mid-19th century suggests that increased solar irradiance, decreased volcanic activity, and feedbacks internal to the climate system played roles.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=14444287752&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=14444287752&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1126/science.278.5341.1251

DO - 10.1126/science.278.5341.1251

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:14444287752

VL - 278

SP - 1251

EP - 1256

JO - Science

JF - Science

SN - 0036-8075

IS - 5341

ER -