Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) stand dynamics: Local and regional factors in a fire-prone madrean gallery forest of Southeast Arizona, USA

Andrew M. Barton, Thomas Swetnam, Christopher H. Baisan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In southwestern North America, large-scale climate patterns appear to exert control on moisture availability, fire occurrence, and tree demography, raising the compelling possibility of regional synchronization of forest dynamics. Such regional signals may be obscured, however, by local, site-specific factors, such as disturbance history and land use. Contiguous sites with similar physical environments, lower and middle Rhyolite Canyon, Arizona, USA, shared nearly the same fire history from 1660-1801, but then diverged. For the next 50 years, fires continued to occur frequently in lower Rhyolite, but, probably as result of flood-induced debris deposition, largely ceased in middle Rhyolite. We related stand dynamics of Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) to fire history and drought severity and compared the dynamics in the two sites before and after the divergence in fire frequency. Fires occurred during unusually dry years, and possibly following unusually moist years. Arizona pine exhibited three age structure peaks: two (1810-1830 and 1870-1900) shared by the two sites and one (1610-1640) only in middle Rhyolite. The latter two peaks occurred during periods of unusually low fire frequency, suggesting that fire-induced mortality shapes age structure. Evidence was mixed for the role of favorable moisture availability in age structure. As expected, moisture availability had a prominent positive effect on radial growth, but the effect of fire was largely neutral. The two sites differed only moderately in stand dynamics during the period of divergence, exhibiting subtle age structure contrasts and, in middle Rhyolite only, reduced growth during a 50-year fire hiatus followed by fire-induced release. These results suggest that, despite local differences in disturbance history, forest responses to regional fire and climate processes can persist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)351-369
Number of pages19
JournalLandscape Ecology
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

regional factors
stand dynamics
local factors
age structure
history
rhyolite
divergence
climate
demography
drought
fire history
moisture
natural disaster
land use
mortality
disturbance
forest dynamics
evidence
hiatus
canyon

Keywords

  • Age structure
  • Arizona pine
  • Dendrochronology
  • Drought severity
  • El Niño
  • Fire
  • Radial growth
  • Stand dynamics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Ecology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Cite this

Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) stand dynamics : Local and regional factors in a fire-prone madrean gallery forest of Southeast Arizona, USA. / Barton, Andrew M.; Swetnam, Thomas; Baisan, Christopher H.

In: Landscape Ecology, Vol. 16, No. 4, 2001, p. 351-369.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{ea4bf2b630a44f0595916b7a2c57e0fa,
title = "Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) stand dynamics: Local and regional factors in a fire-prone madrean gallery forest of Southeast Arizona, USA",
abstract = "In southwestern North America, large-scale climate patterns appear to exert control on moisture availability, fire occurrence, and tree demography, raising the compelling possibility of regional synchronization of forest dynamics. Such regional signals may be obscured, however, by local, site-specific factors, such as disturbance history and land use. Contiguous sites with similar physical environments, lower and middle Rhyolite Canyon, Arizona, USA, shared nearly the same fire history from 1660-1801, but then diverged. For the next 50 years, fires continued to occur frequently in lower Rhyolite, but, probably as result of flood-induced debris deposition, largely ceased in middle Rhyolite. We related stand dynamics of Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) to fire history and drought severity and compared the dynamics in the two sites before and after the divergence in fire frequency. Fires occurred during unusually dry years, and possibly following unusually moist years. Arizona pine exhibited three age structure peaks: two (1810-1830 and 1870-1900) shared by the two sites and one (1610-1640) only in middle Rhyolite. The latter two peaks occurred during periods of unusually low fire frequency, suggesting that fire-induced mortality shapes age structure. Evidence was mixed for the role of favorable moisture availability in age structure. As expected, moisture availability had a prominent positive effect on radial growth, but the effect of fire was largely neutral. The two sites differed only moderately in stand dynamics during the period of divergence, exhibiting subtle age structure contrasts and, in middle Rhyolite only, reduced growth during a 50-year fire hiatus followed by fire-induced release. These results suggest that, despite local differences in disturbance history, forest responses to regional fire and climate processes can persist.",
keywords = "Age structure, Arizona pine, Dendrochronology, Drought severity, El Ni{\~n}o, Fire, Radial growth, Stand dynamics",
author = "Barton, {Andrew M.} and Thomas Swetnam and Baisan, {Christopher H.}",
year = "2001",
doi = "10.1023/A:1011189408651",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "351--369",
journal = "Landscape Ecology",
issn = "0921-2973",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) stand dynamics

T2 - Local and regional factors in a fire-prone madrean gallery forest of Southeast Arizona, USA

AU - Barton, Andrew M.

AU - Swetnam, Thomas

AU - Baisan, Christopher H.

PY - 2001

Y1 - 2001

N2 - In southwestern North America, large-scale climate patterns appear to exert control on moisture availability, fire occurrence, and tree demography, raising the compelling possibility of regional synchronization of forest dynamics. Such regional signals may be obscured, however, by local, site-specific factors, such as disturbance history and land use. Contiguous sites with similar physical environments, lower and middle Rhyolite Canyon, Arizona, USA, shared nearly the same fire history from 1660-1801, but then diverged. For the next 50 years, fires continued to occur frequently in lower Rhyolite, but, probably as result of flood-induced debris deposition, largely ceased in middle Rhyolite. We related stand dynamics of Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) to fire history and drought severity and compared the dynamics in the two sites before and after the divergence in fire frequency. Fires occurred during unusually dry years, and possibly following unusually moist years. Arizona pine exhibited three age structure peaks: two (1810-1830 and 1870-1900) shared by the two sites and one (1610-1640) only in middle Rhyolite. The latter two peaks occurred during periods of unusually low fire frequency, suggesting that fire-induced mortality shapes age structure. Evidence was mixed for the role of favorable moisture availability in age structure. As expected, moisture availability had a prominent positive effect on radial growth, but the effect of fire was largely neutral. The two sites differed only moderately in stand dynamics during the period of divergence, exhibiting subtle age structure contrasts and, in middle Rhyolite only, reduced growth during a 50-year fire hiatus followed by fire-induced release. These results suggest that, despite local differences in disturbance history, forest responses to regional fire and climate processes can persist.

AB - In southwestern North America, large-scale climate patterns appear to exert control on moisture availability, fire occurrence, and tree demography, raising the compelling possibility of regional synchronization of forest dynamics. Such regional signals may be obscured, however, by local, site-specific factors, such as disturbance history and land use. Contiguous sites with similar physical environments, lower and middle Rhyolite Canyon, Arizona, USA, shared nearly the same fire history from 1660-1801, but then diverged. For the next 50 years, fires continued to occur frequently in lower Rhyolite, but, probably as result of flood-induced debris deposition, largely ceased in middle Rhyolite. We related stand dynamics of Arizona pine (Pinus arizonica) to fire history and drought severity and compared the dynamics in the two sites before and after the divergence in fire frequency. Fires occurred during unusually dry years, and possibly following unusually moist years. Arizona pine exhibited three age structure peaks: two (1810-1830 and 1870-1900) shared by the two sites and one (1610-1640) only in middle Rhyolite. The latter two peaks occurred during periods of unusually low fire frequency, suggesting that fire-induced mortality shapes age structure. Evidence was mixed for the role of favorable moisture availability in age structure. As expected, moisture availability had a prominent positive effect on radial growth, but the effect of fire was largely neutral. The two sites differed only moderately in stand dynamics during the period of divergence, exhibiting subtle age structure contrasts and, in middle Rhyolite only, reduced growth during a 50-year fire hiatus followed by fire-induced release. These results suggest that, despite local differences in disturbance history, forest responses to regional fire and climate processes can persist.

KW - Age structure

KW - Arizona pine

KW - Dendrochronology

KW - Drought severity

KW - El Niño

KW - Fire

KW - Radial growth

KW - Stand dynamics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034919664&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034919664&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1023/A:1011189408651

DO - 10.1023/A:1011189408651

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0034919664

VL - 16

SP - 351

EP - 369

JO - Landscape Ecology

JF - Landscape Ecology

SN - 0921-2973

IS - 4

ER -