Arizona's Emergency Medical Services for Children Pediatric Designation System for Emergency Departments

Natasha Smith, Tomi St. Mars, Dale P Woolridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In 2012, a voluntary certification program called Pediatric Prepared Emergency Care (PPEC) was established in Arizona as a system for pediatric emergency preparedness. Emergency medicine and pediatric specialists generated basic, intermediate, and advanced designation criteria. Dedicated medical management by a pediatric emergency specialist is required for advanced centers. Designation follows a site visit, review, and approval by the subcommittee and the Arizona Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Discussion: Arizona has 5 designated pediatric emergency departments, all of which are in the southeast part of the state. Therefore, a designation system was implemented so that all emergency departments statewide can receive more training, support, and supervision of pediatric care. The goal was to create a self-sustaining network with active participation from member institutions while fostering the pediatric commitment. Since its inception, 39 hospitals and 5 tribal facilities have joined PPEC, equating to 51% of Arizona's emergency facilities. Of the hospitals, 7 are advanced, 6 are intermediate, and 17 are basic centers. In 2015, all of the 9 sites due for recertification were recertified. The multiple tiers allow for mutual accountability, sharing of resources, and improved quality of care for pediatrics in emergency departments statewide. Conclusion: PPEC enhances the quality of pediatric emergency preparedness by means of voluntary certification. The primary limitations are sustainability and funding, because an Emergency Medical Services for Children grant has offset the cost until now. The number of member facilities in this designation system is continually growing, and universal recertification shows sustainability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Mar 9 2016

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Emergency Medical Services
Hospital Emergency Service
Pediatrics
Civil Defense
Certification
Emergencies
Voluntary Programs
Training Support
Foster Home Care
Organized Financing
Quality of Health Care
Social Responsibility
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Emergency care for children
  • EMSC
  • Health policy
  • Pediatric emergency department

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Arizona's Emergency Medical Services for Children Pediatric Designation System for Emergency Departments. / Smith, Natasha; St. Mars, Tomi; Woolridge, Dale P.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, 09.03.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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