Assessing climate variability in the Southwest: State of the science

Andrew C. Comrie, Paul R. Sheppard, Gregory D. Packin, Kurt Angersbach, Malcolm K. Hughes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Dry, and hot! For many, these two words sum up the climate of the southwestern United States. The region's low deserts experience searing heat and desiccating winds in the early summer while, in contrast, the forested mountains and plateaus endure biting cold and drifting snow in the heart of winter. The Southwest may be drenched by torrential monsoon thunderstorms in July and August, yet it can warm gently under fair skies from fall to spring. Records of temperature and precipitation change span time scales shorter than seasons and longer than millennia. Droughts and floods that would make headlines elsewhere are almost routine in the Southwest. Variability is therefore the norm, and climate is always fluctuating within this region. How do we explain the complex climate of the Southwest? How has it changed over time, and what might we expect of future climate? In this paper we aim to answer these and related questions to produce an account of the current state of knowledge of natural climate variability in the Southwest. Specifically: What is our understanding of climate variability in the Southwest on seasonal to inter-decadal time scales and what are the sources of this variability? What are the major patterns or types of variability evident from the instrumental record and natural archives such as tree rings, in terms of extremes, drifts in mean, trends or periodic and quasi periodic features? How typical has the instrumental period (i.e., the 20th century) been in the context of these patterns from natural archives?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWRPMD 1999: Preparing for the 21st Century
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
ISBN (Print)0784404305, 9780784404300
DOIs
StatePublished - 1999
Event29th Annual Water Resources Planning and Management Conference, WRPMD 1999 - Tempe, AZ, United States
Duration: Jun 6 1999Jun 9 1999

Other

Other29th Annual Water Resources Planning and Management Conference, WRPMD 1999
CountryUnited States
CityTempe, AZ
Period6/6/996/9/99

Fingerprint

Thunderstorms
Drought
Snow
Temperature
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Comrie, A. C., Sheppard, P. R., Packin, G. D., Angersbach, K., & Hughes, M. K. (1999). Assessing climate variability in the Southwest: State of the science. In WRPMD 1999: Preparing for the 21st Century American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/40430(1999)224

Assessing climate variability in the Southwest : State of the science. / Comrie, Andrew C.; Sheppard, Paul R.; Packin, Gregory D.; Angersbach, Kurt; Hughes, Malcolm K.

WRPMD 1999: Preparing for the 21st Century. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 1999.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Comrie, AC, Sheppard, PR, Packin, GD, Angersbach, K & Hughes, MK 1999, Assessing climate variability in the Southwest: State of the science. in WRPMD 1999: Preparing for the 21st Century. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 29th Annual Water Resources Planning and Management Conference, WRPMD 1999, Tempe, AZ, United States, 6/6/99. https://doi.org/10.1061/40430(1999)224
Comrie AC, Sheppard PR, Packin GD, Angersbach K, Hughes MK. Assessing climate variability in the Southwest: State of the science. In WRPMD 1999: Preparing for the 21st Century. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 1999 https://doi.org/10.1061/40430(1999)224
Comrie, Andrew C. ; Sheppard, Paul R. ; Packin, Gregory D. ; Angersbach, Kurt ; Hughes, Malcolm K. / Assessing climate variability in the Southwest : State of the science. WRPMD 1999: Preparing for the 21st Century. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 1999.
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