Assessing the role of non-cotton refuges in delaying Helicoverpa armigera resistance to Bt cotton in West Africa

Thierry Brévault, Samuel Nibouche, Joseph Achaleke, Yves Carriere

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Non-cotton host plants without Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins can provide refuges that delay resistance to Bt cotton in polyphagous insect pests. It has proven difficult, however, to determine the effective contribution of such refuges and their role in delaying resistance evolution. Here, we used biogeochemical markers to quantify movement of Helicoverpa armigera moths from non-cotton hosts to cotton fields in three agricultural landscapes of the West African cotton belt (Cameroon) where Bt cotton was absent. We show that the contribution of non-cotton hosts as a source of moths was spatially and temporally variable, but at least equivalent to a 7.5% sprayed refuge of non-Bt cotton. Simulation models incorporating H. armigera biological parameters, however, indicate that planting non-Bt cotton refuges may be needed to significantly delay resistance to cotton producing the toxins Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab. Specifically, when the concentration of one toxin (here Cry1Ac) declined seasonally, resistance to Bt cotton often occurred rapidly in simulations where refuges of non-Bt cotton were rare and resistance to Cry2Ab was non-recessive, because resistance was essentially driven by one toxin (here Cry2Ab). The use of biogeochemical markers to quantify insect movement can provide a valuable tool to evaluate the role of non-cotton refuges in delaying the evolution of H. armigera resistance to Bt cotton.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-65
Number of pages13
JournalEvolutionary Applications
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Bacillus thuringiensis
Western Africa
Helicoverpa armigera
refuge
cotton
Moths
toxin
Insects
toxins
Cameroon
moth
moths
West Africa
insect
insect pests
host plant
simulation
simulation models
host plants
agricultural land

Keywords

  • Bacillus thuringiensis
  • Biogeochemical markers
  • Bt cotton
  • Genetically engineered crops
  • Insect resistance management
  • Polyphagous pest
  • Refuge strategy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Genetics

Cite this

Assessing the role of non-cotton refuges in delaying Helicoverpa armigera resistance to Bt cotton in West Africa. / Brévault, Thierry; Nibouche, Samuel; Achaleke, Joseph; Carriere, Yves.

In: Evolutionary Applications, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 53-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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