Assessment model for quantifiably measuring the impact of an information-based decision support system in a coal mine integrated remote control room

V. O. Tenorio, S. D. Dessureault

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The largest surface coal mine in North America requires complex materials handling infrastructure to fulfil the highly variable quality specifications of its contracts. These diverse demands, reflected in the arrival of numerous customer trains every day, necessitate the integration of information in every stage of production. To meet this goal, quality measurement, train line-up and mine planning processes are being integrated into local and remote control rooms. The effectiveness of such a system can only be measured by comparing decisions that are made with, and without, each of the individual integrated control systems. Traditionally, mine controllers use their experience, intuition or a variety of trial-and-error spreadsheets to determine the ideal materials handling flows needed to achieve the correct quality. These balanced decisions are complex since many factors must be considered such as the mine plan, fleet costs, quality variability and others; consequently mine controllers usually have widely varying success between crews. An evaluation model was developed to assess the impact of a decision support system (DSS) integrated in a control room for controlling the coal blending process. To this end, an ARENA-based simulator representing the whole production process can be used to pull performance and current materials handling settings directly either from the real-time systems in the mine, or from historical data. In this way, the same shift (breakdowns, cycle rates, etc) can be simulated and performance compared. Different settings of the DSS, in terms of what information is displayed and the methods for doing so, can be tested for effectiveness. The historical data are extracted directly from a corporate data warehouse, without altering the everyday working databases. At the same time, the simulator writes its results back into the same data warehouse structure, allowing the same KPI reports to be used to measure simulated shifts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication35th APCOM Symposium - Application of Computers and Operations Research in the Minerals Industry, Proceedings
Pages779-787
Number of pages9
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event35th International Symposium of Application of Computers and Operations Research in the Minerals Industry, APCOM - Wollongong, NSW, Australia
Duration: Sep 24 2011Sep 30 2011

Publication series

Name35th APCOM Symposium - Application of Computers and Operations Research in the Minerals Industry, Proceedings

Other

Other35th International Symposium of Application of Computers and Operations Research in the Minerals Industry, APCOM
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CityWollongong, NSW
Period9/24/119/30/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Science and Operations Research

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