Assessment of air vs helium-oxygen flow-volume curves as an epidemiologic screening test

R. J. Knudson, John W Bloom, W. T. Kaltenborn, B. Burrows, M. D. Lebowitz

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Abstract

Air and helium-oxygen maximum expiratory flow-volume curves were employed in an epidemiologic field study to assess the utility of density dependence as a screening test. Of 1,584 subjects tested, only 54.1 percent were able to perform the test with vital capacities for the two gases that agreed to within 5 percent. Subjects unable to perform the test properly tended to be older, with a greater prevalence of ventilatory function abnormalities and respiratory problems, than those who could perform the test. There was poor concordance between density dependence, or lack thereof, and standard ventilatory function measurements or evidence of respiratory disease. Under field survey conditions, the test of density dependence did not appear to be a useful screening tool.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)419-423
Number of pages5
JournalChest
Volume86
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1984

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Knudson, R. J., Bloom, J. W., Kaltenborn, W. T., Burrows, B., & Lebowitz, M. D. (1984). Assessment of air vs helium-oxygen flow-volume curves as an epidemiologic screening test. Chest, 86(3), 419-423.