Assessment of decisional conflict about the treatment of trigger finger, comparing patients and physicians

Science of Variation Group

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: As an early step in the development of a decision aid for idiopathic trigger finger (TF) we were interested in the level of decisional conflict experienced by patients and hand surgeons. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in decisional conflict between patients with one or more idiopathic trigger fingers and hand surgeons. Secondary analyses address the differences between patients and surgeons regarding the influence of the DCS-subcategories on the level of decisional conflict, as well as the influence of patient and physician demographics, the level of self-efficacy, and satisfaction with care on decisional conflict. Methods: One hundred and five hand surgeon-members of the Science of Variation Group (SOVG) and 84 patients with idiopathic TF completed the survey regarding the Decisional Conflict Scale. Patients also filled out the Pain Self-efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) and the Patient Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Results: On average, patients had decisional conflict comparable to physicians, but by specific category patients felt less informed and supported than physicians. The only factors associated with greater decisional conflict was the relationship between the patient and doctor. Conclusions: There is a low, but measurable level of decisional conflict among patients and surgeons regarding idiopathic trigger finger. Studies testing the ability of decision aids to reduce decisional conflict and improve patient empowerment and satisfaction with care are merited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-358
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Bone and Joint Surgery
Volume4
Issue number4
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

Fingers
Physicians
Therapeutics
Decision Support Techniques
Hand
Self Efficacy
Conflict (Psychology)
Patient Participation
Aptitude
Patient Satisfaction
Demography
Surgeons
Pain

Keywords

  • Assessment of needs
  • Decisional conflict scale
  • Shared decision making
  • Trigger finger

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Assessment of decisional conflict about the treatment of trigger finger, comparing patients and physicians. / Science of Variation Group.

In: Archives of Bone and Joint Surgery, Vol. 4, No. 4, 2016, p. 353-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Assessment of decisional conflict about the treatment of trigger finger, comparing patients and physicians",
abstract = "Background: As an early step in the development of a decision aid for idiopathic trigger finger (TF) we were interested in the level of decisional conflict experienced by patients and hand surgeons. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in decisional conflict between patients with one or more idiopathic trigger fingers and hand surgeons. Secondary analyses address the differences between patients and surgeons regarding the influence of the DCS-subcategories on the level of decisional conflict, as well as the influence of patient and physician demographics, the level of self-efficacy, and satisfaction with care on decisional conflict. Methods: One hundred and five hand surgeon-members of the Science of Variation Group (SOVG) and 84 patients with idiopathic TF completed the survey regarding the Decisional Conflict Scale. Patients also filled out the Pain Self-efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) and the Patient Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Results: On average, patients had decisional conflict comparable to physicians, but by specific category patients felt less informed and supported than physicians. The only factors associated with greater decisional conflict was the relationship between the patient and doctor. Conclusions: There is a low, but measurable level of decisional conflict among patients and surgeons regarding idiopathic trigger finger. Studies testing the ability of decision aids to reduce decisional conflict and improve patient empowerment and satisfaction with care are merited.",
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AU - Baskies, Michael

AU - Baxamusa, Taizoon

AU - Behrman, Michael

AU - Benhaim, Prosper

AU - Blazar, Philip

AU - Boler, James M.

AU - Boretto, Jorge G.

AU - Boyer, Martin

AU - Calfee, Ryan P.

AU - Cassidy, Charles

AU - Costanzo, Ralp M.

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AU - de Bedout, Ramon

AU - Desilva, Gregory L

AU - Di Giovanni, Jose Fernando

AU - Dodds, Seth

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AU - Felipe, Naquira Escobar Luis

AU - Fernandes, C. H.

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N2 - Background: As an early step in the development of a decision aid for idiopathic trigger finger (TF) we were interested in the level of decisional conflict experienced by patients and hand surgeons. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no difference in decisional conflict between patients with one or more idiopathic trigger fingers and hand surgeons. Secondary analyses address the differences between patients and surgeons regarding the influence of the DCS-subcategories on the level of decisional conflict, as well as the influence of patient and physician demographics, the level of self-efficacy, and satisfaction with care on decisional conflict. Methods: One hundred and five hand surgeon-members of the Science of Variation Group (SOVG) and 84 patients with idiopathic TF completed the survey regarding the Decisional Conflict Scale. Patients also filled out the Pain Self-efficacy Questionnaire (PSEQ) and the Patient Doctor Relationship Questionnaire (PDRQ-9). Results: On average, patients had decisional conflict comparable to physicians, but by specific category patients felt less informed and supported than physicians. The only factors associated with greater decisional conflict was the relationship between the patient and doctor. Conclusions: There is a low, but measurable level of decisional conflict among patients and surgeons regarding idiopathic trigger finger. Studies testing the ability of decision aids to reduce decisional conflict and improve patient empowerment and satisfaction with care are merited.

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