Association of health literacy with adherence to screening mammography guidelines

Ian K. Komenaka, Jesse N. Nodora, Chiu-Hsieh Hsu, Maria Elena Martinez, Sonal G. Gandhi, Marcia E. Bouton, Anne E. Klemens, Lauren I. Wikholm, Barry D Weiss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate the relationship of health literacy and screening mammography. Methods: All patients seen at a breast clinic underwent prospective assessment of health literacy from January 2010 to April 2013. All women at least 40 years of age were included. Men and women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40 years were excluded. Routine health literacy assessment was performed using the Newest Vital Sign. Demographic data were also collected. Medical records were reviewed to determine if patients had undergone screening mammography: women aged 40-49 years were considered to have undergone screening if they had another mammogram within 2 years. Women 50 years or older were considered to have undergone screening mammography if they had another mammogram within 1 year. Results: A total of 1,664 consecutive patients aged 40 years or older were seen. No patient declined the health literacy assessment. Only 516 (31%) patients had undergone screening mammography. Logistic regression analysis that included ethnicity, language, education, smoking status, insurance status, employment, income, and family history found that only three factors were associated with not obtaining a mammogram: low health literacy (odds ratio [OR] 0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.19-0.37; P<.001), smoking (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47-0.85; P.002), and being uninsured (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.85; P.001). Conclusion: Of all the sociodemographic variables examined, health literacy had the strongest relationship with use of screening mammography.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)852-859
Number of pages8
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume125
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 24 2015

Fingerprint

Health Literacy
Mammography
Guidelines
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Smoking
Insurance Coverage
Vital Signs
Medical Records
Breast
Language
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
Breast Neoplasms
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Association of health literacy with adherence to screening mammography guidelines. / Komenaka, Ian K.; Nodora, Jesse N.; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh; Martinez, Maria Elena; Gandhi, Sonal G.; Bouton, Marcia E.; Klemens, Anne E.; Wikholm, Lauren I.; Weiss, Barry D.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 125, No. 4, 24.04.2015, p. 852-859.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Komenaka, IK, Nodora, JN, Hsu, C-H, Martinez, ME, Gandhi, SG, Bouton, ME, Klemens, AE, Wikholm, LI & Weiss, BD 2015, 'Association of health literacy with adherence to screening mammography guidelines', Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 125, no. 4, pp. 852-859. https://doi.org/10.1097/AOG.0000000000000708
Komenaka, Ian K. ; Nodora, Jesse N. ; Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh ; Martinez, Maria Elena ; Gandhi, Sonal G. ; Bouton, Marcia E. ; Klemens, Anne E. ; Wikholm, Lauren I. ; Weiss, Barry D. / Association of health literacy with adherence to screening mammography guidelines. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2015 ; Vol. 125, No. 4. pp. 852-859.
@article{fde17684a25143a4a746797242d5ddc3,
title = "Association of health literacy with adherence to screening mammography guidelines",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate the relationship of health literacy and screening mammography. Methods: All patients seen at a breast clinic underwent prospective assessment of health literacy from January 2010 to April 2013. All women at least 40 years of age were included. Men and women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40 years were excluded. Routine health literacy assessment was performed using the Newest Vital Sign. Demographic data were also collected. Medical records were reviewed to determine if patients had undergone screening mammography: women aged 40-49 years were considered to have undergone screening if they had another mammogram within 2 years. Women 50 years or older were considered to have undergone screening mammography if they had another mammogram within 1 year. Results: A total of 1,664 consecutive patients aged 40 years or older were seen. No patient declined the health literacy assessment. Only 516 (31{\%}) patients had undergone screening mammography. Logistic regression analysis that included ethnicity, language, education, smoking status, insurance status, employment, income, and family history found that only three factors were associated with not obtaining a mammogram: low health literacy (odds ratio [OR] 0.27, 95{\%} confidence interval [CI] 0.19-0.37; P<.001), smoking (OR 0.64, 95{\%} CI 0.47-0.85; P.002), and being uninsured (OR 0.66, 95{\%} CI 0.51-0.85; P.001). Conclusion: Of all the sociodemographic variables examined, health literacy had the strongest relationship with use of screening mammography.",
author = "Komenaka, {Ian K.} and Nodora, {Jesse N.} and Chiu-Hsieh Hsu and Martinez, {Maria Elena} and Gandhi, {Sonal G.} and Bouton, {Marcia E.} and Klemens, {Anne E.} and Wikholm, {Lauren I.} and Weiss, {Barry D}",
year = "2015",
month = "4",
day = "24",
doi = "10.1097/AOG.0000000000000708",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "125",
pages = "852--859",
journal = "Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0029-7844",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Association of health literacy with adherence to screening mammography guidelines

AU - Komenaka, Ian K.

AU - Nodora, Jesse N.

AU - Hsu, Chiu-Hsieh

AU - Martinez, Maria Elena

AU - Gandhi, Sonal G.

AU - Bouton, Marcia E.

AU - Klemens, Anne E.

AU - Wikholm, Lauren I.

AU - Weiss, Barry D

PY - 2015/4/24

Y1 - 2015/4/24

N2 - Objective: To investigate the relationship of health literacy and screening mammography. Methods: All patients seen at a breast clinic underwent prospective assessment of health literacy from January 2010 to April 2013. All women at least 40 years of age were included. Men and women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40 years were excluded. Routine health literacy assessment was performed using the Newest Vital Sign. Demographic data were also collected. Medical records were reviewed to determine if patients had undergone screening mammography: women aged 40-49 years were considered to have undergone screening if they had another mammogram within 2 years. Women 50 years or older were considered to have undergone screening mammography if they had another mammogram within 1 year. Results: A total of 1,664 consecutive patients aged 40 years or older were seen. No patient declined the health literacy assessment. Only 516 (31%) patients had undergone screening mammography. Logistic regression analysis that included ethnicity, language, education, smoking status, insurance status, employment, income, and family history found that only three factors were associated with not obtaining a mammogram: low health literacy (odds ratio [OR] 0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.19-0.37; P<.001), smoking (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47-0.85; P.002), and being uninsured (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.85; P.001). Conclusion: Of all the sociodemographic variables examined, health literacy had the strongest relationship with use of screening mammography.

AB - Objective: To investigate the relationship of health literacy and screening mammography. Methods: All patients seen at a breast clinic underwent prospective assessment of health literacy from January 2010 to April 2013. All women at least 40 years of age were included. Men and women diagnosed with breast cancer before age 40 years were excluded. Routine health literacy assessment was performed using the Newest Vital Sign. Demographic data were also collected. Medical records were reviewed to determine if patients had undergone screening mammography: women aged 40-49 years were considered to have undergone screening if they had another mammogram within 2 years. Women 50 years or older were considered to have undergone screening mammography if they had another mammogram within 1 year. Results: A total of 1,664 consecutive patients aged 40 years or older were seen. No patient declined the health literacy assessment. Only 516 (31%) patients had undergone screening mammography. Logistic regression analysis that included ethnicity, language, education, smoking status, insurance status, employment, income, and family history found that only three factors were associated with not obtaining a mammogram: low health literacy (odds ratio [OR] 0.27, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.19-0.37; P<.001), smoking (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47-0.85; P.002), and being uninsured (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.85; P.001). Conclusion: Of all the sociodemographic variables examined, health literacy had the strongest relationship with use of screening mammography.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925452672&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925452672&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000708

DO - 10.1097/AOG.0000000000000708

M3 - Article

C2 - 25751204

AN - SCOPUS:84925452672

VL - 125

SP - 852

EP - 859

JO - Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0029-7844

IS - 4

ER -