Associations between chemical odor intolerance and sleep disturbances in community-living adults

Carol M. Baldwin, Iris R. Bell, Stefano Guerra, Stuart F Quan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To investigate associations between sleep disturbances and chemical odor intolerance (COI), which is the subjective report of feeling ill from common odors, such as carpet glue or pesticides. Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of government employees and their family members (n=140; 61% women, mean age=46.3 years) derived from a stratified cluster population living in Pima County, Tucson, AZ. Subjects completed a standard survey that included sleep symptoms, a validated measure of COI, and two questions regarding anxiety and depression. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed to test the association between COI and sleep symptoms. Stratification according to the Mantel-Haenszel method and logistic regression models were used to test for confounding and/or effect modification. Results: After adjusting for age and gender, subjects with COI were significantly more likely to report difficulty staying asleep (OR=3.06; CI=1.17-8.03), insufficient sleep (OR=3.93; CI=1.43-10.79), and nightmares (OR=3.17; CI=1.14-8.81) compared to persons without COI. Associations between COI, sleep maintenance problems and insufficient sleep were still significant after adjusting for gender and depression; however, the association between COI and nightmares became borderline. Conclusions: Compared to the non-COI, persons with COI are more likely to report sleep maintenance insomnia and insufficient sleep independent of self-reported depression. Nightmares appear to be related more to depression than to COI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)53-59
Number of pages7
JournalSleep Medicine
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004

Fingerprint

Sleep
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Depression
Chemical Depression
Odorants
Logistic Models
Maintenance
Potassium Iodide
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Pesticides
Adhesives
Emotions
Anxiety
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population

Keywords

  • Chemical odor intolerance
  • Cross-sectional
  • Depression
  • Difficulty staying asleep
  • Epidemiology
  • Insufficient sleep
  • Nightmares

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)
  • Ophthalmology
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology

Cite this

Associations between chemical odor intolerance and sleep disturbances in community-living adults. / Baldwin, Carol M.; Bell, Iris R.; Guerra, Stefano; Quan, Stuart F.

In: Sleep Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 53-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Baldwin, Carol M. ; Bell, Iris R. ; Guerra, Stefano ; Quan, Stuart F. / Associations between chemical odor intolerance and sleep disturbances in community-living adults. In: Sleep Medicine. 2004 ; Vol. 5, No. 1. pp. 53-59.
@article{c28a2a66130349ae9bb5fe83e46dd19f,
title = "Associations between chemical odor intolerance and sleep disturbances in community-living adults",
abstract = "Objective: To investigate associations between sleep disturbances and chemical odor intolerance (COI), which is the subjective report of feeling ill from common odors, such as carpet glue or pesticides. Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of government employees and their family members (n=140; 61{\%} women, mean age=46.3 years) derived from a stratified cluster population living in Pima County, Tucson, AZ. Subjects completed a standard survey that included sleep symptoms, a validated measure of COI, and two questions regarding anxiety and depression. Odds ratios (OR) with 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) were computed to test the association between COI and sleep symptoms. Stratification according to the Mantel-Haenszel method and logistic regression models were used to test for confounding and/or effect modification. Results: After adjusting for age and gender, subjects with COI were significantly more likely to report difficulty staying asleep (OR=3.06; CI=1.17-8.03), insufficient sleep (OR=3.93; CI=1.43-10.79), and nightmares (OR=3.17; CI=1.14-8.81) compared to persons without COI. Associations between COI, sleep maintenance problems and insufficient sleep were still significant after adjusting for gender and depression; however, the association between COI and nightmares became borderline. Conclusions: Compared to the non-COI, persons with COI are more likely to report sleep maintenance insomnia and insufficient sleep independent of self-reported depression. Nightmares appear to be related more to depression than to COI.",
keywords = "Chemical odor intolerance, Cross-sectional, Depression, Difficulty staying asleep, Epidemiology, Insufficient sleep, Nightmares",
author = "Baldwin, {Carol M.} and Bell, {Iris R.} and Stefano Guerra and Quan, {Stuart F}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/S1389-9457(03)00164-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "53--59",
journal = "Sleep Medicine",
issn = "1389-9457",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Associations between chemical odor intolerance and sleep disturbances in community-living adults

AU - Baldwin, Carol M.

AU - Bell, Iris R.

AU - Guerra, Stefano

AU - Quan, Stuart F

PY - 2004/1

Y1 - 2004/1

N2 - Objective: To investigate associations between sleep disturbances and chemical odor intolerance (COI), which is the subjective report of feeling ill from common odors, such as carpet glue or pesticides. Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of government employees and their family members (n=140; 61% women, mean age=46.3 years) derived from a stratified cluster population living in Pima County, Tucson, AZ. Subjects completed a standard survey that included sleep symptoms, a validated measure of COI, and two questions regarding anxiety and depression. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed to test the association between COI and sleep symptoms. Stratification according to the Mantel-Haenszel method and logistic regression models were used to test for confounding and/or effect modification. Results: After adjusting for age and gender, subjects with COI were significantly more likely to report difficulty staying asleep (OR=3.06; CI=1.17-8.03), insufficient sleep (OR=3.93; CI=1.43-10.79), and nightmares (OR=3.17; CI=1.14-8.81) compared to persons without COI. Associations between COI, sleep maintenance problems and insufficient sleep were still significant after adjusting for gender and depression; however, the association between COI and nightmares became borderline. Conclusions: Compared to the non-COI, persons with COI are more likely to report sleep maintenance insomnia and insufficient sleep independent of self-reported depression. Nightmares appear to be related more to depression than to COI.

AB - Objective: To investigate associations between sleep disturbances and chemical odor intolerance (COI), which is the subjective report of feeling ill from common odors, such as carpet glue or pesticides. Methods: This cross-sectional study consisted of government employees and their family members (n=140; 61% women, mean age=46.3 years) derived from a stratified cluster population living in Pima County, Tucson, AZ. Subjects completed a standard survey that included sleep symptoms, a validated measure of COI, and two questions regarding anxiety and depression. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed to test the association between COI and sleep symptoms. Stratification according to the Mantel-Haenszel method and logistic regression models were used to test for confounding and/or effect modification. Results: After adjusting for age and gender, subjects with COI were significantly more likely to report difficulty staying asleep (OR=3.06; CI=1.17-8.03), insufficient sleep (OR=3.93; CI=1.43-10.79), and nightmares (OR=3.17; CI=1.14-8.81) compared to persons without COI. Associations between COI, sleep maintenance problems and insufficient sleep were still significant after adjusting for gender and depression; however, the association between COI and nightmares became borderline. Conclusions: Compared to the non-COI, persons with COI are more likely to report sleep maintenance insomnia and insufficient sleep independent of self-reported depression. Nightmares appear to be related more to depression than to COI.

KW - Chemical odor intolerance

KW - Cross-sectional

KW - Depression

KW - Difficulty staying asleep

KW - Epidemiology

KW - Insufficient sleep

KW - Nightmares

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0742288846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0742288846&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S1389-9457(03)00164-3

DO - 10.1016/S1389-9457(03)00164-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 14725827

AN - SCOPUS:0742288846

VL - 5

SP - 53

EP - 59

JO - Sleep Medicine

JF - Sleep Medicine

SN - 1389-9457

IS - 1

ER -