Associations of body size and composition with physical activity in adolescent girls

Timothy G Lohman, Kimberly Ring, Kathryn H. Schmitz, Margarita S. Treuth, Mark Loftin, Song Yang, Melinda Sothern, Scott B Going

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To examine whether components of body composition (size, fat mass, and fat-free mass) were related to physical activity. Methods: A random sample of 60 eligible sixth grade girls at each of 36 schools (six schools per region and six regions in total sample); complete measurements on 1553 girls. Physical activity was assessed over 6 d in each girl using an accelerometer, and body composition was assessed using a multiple regression equation using body mass index and triceps skinfold. Minutes of moderate-to-vigorous and vigorous physical activity were estimated from accelerometer counts per 30 s above threshold values determined from a previous study. Results: Significant inverse relationships were found for all measures of body size and composition and all physical activity indices. The combination of fat and fat-free mass expressed as a weight and as an index (divided by height squared) along with race, SES, site, and school were most highly associated with physical activity in multiple regression analysis, accounting for 14-15% of the variance in physical activity. Fat mass was more closely related to moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) and vigorous physical activity (VPA) than fat-free mass with higher standardized regression coefficients. Conclusion: We conclude that both fat mass or fat mass index as well as fat-free mass or fat-free mass index make independent contributions in association with physical activity levels. These indices are recommended for future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1175-1181
Number of pages7
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2006

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Body Size
Body Composition
Fats
Exercise
Body Mass Index
Regression Analysis
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Exercise
  • Fat mass
  • Fat-free mass
  • Physical activity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Associations of body size and composition with physical activity in adolescent girls. / Lohman, Timothy G; Ring, Kimberly; Schmitz, Kathryn H.; Treuth, Margarita S.; Loftin, Mark; Yang, Song; Sothern, Melinda; Going, Scott B.

In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, Vol. 38, No. 6, 06.2006, p. 1175-1181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lohman, Timothy G ; Ring, Kimberly ; Schmitz, Kathryn H. ; Treuth, Margarita S. ; Loftin, Mark ; Yang, Song ; Sothern, Melinda ; Going, Scott B. / Associations of body size and composition with physical activity in adolescent girls. In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2006 ; Vol. 38, No. 6. pp. 1175-1181.
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