Associations of the lactase persistence allele and lactose intake with body composition among multiethnic children

Adil J. Malek, Yann C Klimentidis, Kenneth P. Kell, José R. Fernández

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Childhood obesity is a worldwide health concern with a multifaceted and sometimes confounding etiology. Dairy products have been implicated as both pro- and anti-obesogenic, perhaps due to the confounding relationship between dairy, lactose consumption, and potential genetic predisposition. We aimed to understand how lactase persistence influenced obesity-related traits by observing the relationships among lactose consumption, a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) near the lactase (LCT) gene and body composition parameters in a sample of multiethnic children (n = 296, 7-12 years old). We hypothesized that individuals with the lactase persistence (LP) allele of the LCT SNP (rs4988235) would exhibit a greater degree of adiposity and that this relationship would be mediated by lactose consumption. Body composition variables were measured using dual X-ray absorptiometry and a registered dietitian assessed dietary intake of lactose. Statistical models were adjusted for sex, age, pubertal stage, ethnic group, genetic admixture, socio-economic status, and total energy intake. Our findings indicate a positive, significant association between the LP allele and body mass index (p = 0.034), fat mass index (FMI) (p = 0.043), and waist circumference (p = 0.008), with associations being stronger in males than in females. Our results also reveal that lactose consumption is positively and nearly significantly associated with FMI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-494
Number of pages8
JournalGenes and Nutrition
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

Lactase
Lactose
Body Composition
Alleles
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Fats
Dairy Products
Nutritionists
Pediatric Obesity
Photon Absorptiometry
Adiposity
Waist Circumference
Statistical Models
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Energy Intake
Ethnic Groups
Body Mass Index
Obesity
Economics
Genes

Keywords

  • Body composition
  • Children
  • Genetics
  • Lactase persistence
  • Lactose
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Genetics

Cite this

Associations of the lactase persistence allele and lactose intake with body composition among multiethnic children. / Malek, Adil J.; Klimentidis, Yann C; Kell, Kenneth P.; Fernández, José R.

In: Genes and Nutrition, Vol. 8, No. 5, 09.2013, p. 487-494.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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