Asteroidal regoliths

what we do not know

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most of our knowledge of asteroidal regoliths is indirect. It comes primarily from extensive studies of the lunar regolith and meteorite regolith breccias, and from theroretical models which try to match some characteristics of these two types of samples. There is evidence that at least some were assembled in their present form more than 4Gyr ago. Also, since regoliths can change with time because of changes in the flux and velocity of impactors, the properties of meteorite breccias may not reflect those of modern asteroidal regoliths. In addition, some meteorite breccias may come from either accretional regoliths or the megaregoliths predicted to result from catastrophic disruption of an asteroid followed by re-accretion. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAsteroids II
EditorsR.P. Binzel
PublisherUniversity of Arizona Press
Pages617-642
Number of pages26
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

meteorite
regolith
asteroid
accretion
impactor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

McKay, D. S., Swindle, T., & Greenberg, R. J. (1989). Asteroidal regoliths: what we do not know. In R. P. Binzel (Ed.), Asteroids II (pp. 617-642). University of Arizona Press.

Asteroidal regoliths : what we do not know. / McKay, D. S.; Swindle, Timothy; Greenberg, Richard J.

Asteroids II. ed. / R.P. Binzel. University of Arizona Press, 1989. p. 617-642.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

McKay, DS, Swindle, T & Greenberg, RJ 1989, Asteroidal regoliths: what we do not know. in RP Binzel (ed.), Asteroids II. University of Arizona Press, pp. 617-642.
McKay DS, Swindle T, Greenberg RJ. Asteroidal regoliths: what we do not know. In Binzel RP, editor, Asteroids II. University of Arizona Press. 1989. p. 617-642
McKay, D. S. ; Swindle, Timothy ; Greenberg, Richard J. / Asteroidal regoliths : what we do not know. Asteroids II. editor / R.P. Binzel. University of Arizona Press, 1989. pp. 617-642
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