Asthma risk factors in Desert Southwest of USA

Role of nutritional supplement, Pycnogenol® in therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Desert environments have some unique causative agents that promote asthma. These include molds like Alternaria alternata and Dermatophagoides farinae, and Bermuda grass pollen. In addition, dietary supplements with antioxidant activities are being shown to reduce asthma symptoms with Pycnogenol being the example used. Design: Literature review. Materials and methods: This review was conducted by searching PubMed and other medical databases, as well as doing original research reviewed. It was presented at the meeting of the British Society for Ecological Medicine in London, June 2006. Results: Recent studies are defining the risk factors for asthma induction in children in the desert environment of Southwest USA. In particular, exposure to molds and pets, maternal smoking, and being overweight. Two recent studies have shown that Pycnogenol, a dietary supplement containing bioflavanoids with strong antioxidant activity, reduced asthma symptoms in adults and youths. There was evidence that the extract lowered symptoms and reduced use of rescue inhalers. In addition, Pycnogenol reduced serum leukotrienes helping explain its action. Conclusions: Exposure to desert materials, in particular Alternaria alternata, increased risk of childhood asthma while Dermatophagoides farinae had no effect. Therapy was successful using a dietary supplement, Pycnogenol, containing bioflavanoids with strong antioxidant activities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-38
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Nutritional and Environmental Medicine
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2007

Fingerprint

asthma
dietary supplements
deserts
risk factors
Asthma
therapeutics
Dietary Supplements
Dermatophagoides farinae
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Alternaria
Antioxidants
antioxidant activity
Alternaria alternata
Fungi
Cynodon
Therapeutics
leukotrienes
Leukotrienes
Nebulizers and Vaporizers
smoking (food products)

Keywords

  • Alternaria
  • Asthma
  • Bioflavanoids
  • Dietary supplement
  • Leukotrienes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

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title = "Asthma risk factors in Desert Southwest of USA: Role of nutritional supplement, Pycnogenol{\circledR} in therapy",
abstract = "Purpose: Desert environments have some unique causative agents that promote asthma. These include molds like Alternaria alternata and Dermatophagoides farinae, and Bermuda grass pollen. In addition, dietary supplements with antioxidant activities are being shown to reduce asthma symptoms with Pycnogenol being the example used. Design: Literature review. Materials and methods: This review was conducted by searching PubMed and other medical databases, as well as doing original research reviewed. It was presented at the meeting of the British Society for Ecological Medicine in London, June 2006. Results: Recent studies are defining the risk factors for asthma induction in children in the desert environment of Southwest USA. In particular, exposure to molds and pets, maternal smoking, and being overweight. Two recent studies have shown that Pycnogenol, a dietary supplement containing bioflavanoids with strong antioxidant activity, reduced asthma symptoms in adults and youths. There was evidence that the extract lowered symptoms and reduced use of rescue inhalers. In addition, Pycnogenol reduced serum leukotrienes helping explain its action. Conclusions: Exposure to desert materials, in particular Alternaria alternata, increased risk of childhood asthma while Dermatophagoides farinae had no effect. Therapy was successful using a dietary supplement, Pycnogenol, containing bioflavanoids with strong antioxidant activities.",
keywords = "Alternaria, Asthma, Bioflavanoids, Dietary supplement, Leukotrienes",
author = "Watson, {Ronald R} and Peter Rohdewald and {Silva Torres}, {Graciela Emilia}",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1080/13590840701324855",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "16",
pages = "33--38",
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AU - Rohdewald, Peter

AU - Silva Torres, Graciela Emilia

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N2 - Purpose: Desert environments have some unique causative agents that promote asthma. These include molds like Alternaria alternata and Dermatophagoides farinae, and Bermuda grass pollen. In addition, dietary supplements with antioxidant activities are being shown to reduce asthma symptoms with Pycnogenol being the example used. Design: Literature review. Materials and methods: This review was conducted by searching PubMed and other medical databases, as well as doing original research reviewed. It was presented at the meeting of the British Society for Ecological Medicine in London, June 2006. Results: Recent studies are defining the risk factors for asthma induction in children in the desert environment of Southwest USA. In particular, exposure to molds and pets, maternal smoking, and being overweight. Two recent studies have shown that Pycnogenol, a dietary supplement containing bioflavanoids with strong antioxidant activity, reduced asthma symptoms in adults and youths. There was evidence that the extract lowered symptoms and reduced use of rescue inhalers. In addition, Pycnogenol reduced serum leukotrienes helping explain its action. Conclusions: Exposure to desert materials, in particular Alternaria alternata, increased risk of childhood asthma while Dermatophagoides farinae had no effect. Therapy was successful using a dietary supplement, Pycnogenol, containing bioflavanoids with strong antioxidant activities.

AB - Purpose: Desert environments have some unique causative agents that promote asthma. These include molds like Alternaria alternata and Dermatophagoides farinae, and Bermuda grass pollen. In addition, dietary supplements with antioxidant activities are being shown to reduce asthma symptoms with Pycnogenol being the example used. Design: Literature review. Materials and methods: This review was conducted by searching PubMed and other medical databases, as well as doing original research reviewed. It was presented at the meeting of the British Society for Ecological Medicine in London, June 2006. Results: Recent studies are defining the risk factors for asthma induction in children in the desert environment of Southwest USA. In particular, exposure to molds and pets, maternal smoking, and being overweight. Two recent studies have shown that Pycnogenol, a dietary supplement containing bioflavanoids with strong antioxidant activity, reduced asthma symptoms in adults and youths. There was evidence that the extract lowered symptoms and reduced use of rescue inhalers. In addition, Pycnogenol reduced serum leukotrienes helping explain its action. Conclusions: Exposure to desert materials, in particular Alternaria alternata, increased risk of childhood asthma while Dermatophagoides farinae had no effect. Therapy was successful using a dietary supplement, Pycnogenol, containing bioflavanoids with strong antioxidant activities.

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