A2: Element or compound?

Marilyne Stains, Vicente A Talanquer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Particulate questions were used to investigate the strength of the metal association between the concept of compound and microscopic representations of molecules in students with different levels of chemistry preparation. Research subjects included undergraduate students enrolled in general chemistry, organic chemistry and physical chemistry courses at the Department of Chemistry of the University of Arizona as well as graduate students from different areas and stages in their degree program in the chemistry department. Focus was on the answers that students provided when asked to classify substances such as A2 and F4 as elements, compounds or mixtures. Overall, results show that a significant proportion of students in advanced chemistry courses misclassified molecular elements as chemical compounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)880-883
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Chemical Education
Volume84
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2007

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chemistry
Students
student
Physical chemistry
Chemical compounds
Metals
Association reactions
Molecules
graduate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Education

Cite this

A2 : Element or compound? / Stains, Marilyne; Talanquer, Vicente A.

In: Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 84, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 880-883.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stains, M & Talanquer, VA 2007, 'A2: Element or compound?', Journal of Chemical Education, vol. 84, no. 5, pp. 880-883.
Stains, Marilyne ; Talanquer, Vicente A. / A2 : Element or compound?. In: Journal of Chemical Education. 2007 ; Vol. 84, No. 5. pp. 880-883.
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