Asymmetric adaptability: Dynamic team structures as one-way streets

Henry Moon, John R. Hollenbeck, Stephen E. Humphrey, Daniel R. Ilgen, Bradley West, Aleksander P J Ellis, Christopher O L H Porter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tested whether teams working on a command and control simulation adapted to structural change in the manner implied by contingency theories. Teams shifting from a functional to a divisional structure showed better performance than teams making a divisional-to-functional shift. Team levels of coordination mediated this difference, and team levels of cognitive ability moderated it. We argue that the static logic behind many contingency theories should be complemented with a dynamic logic challenging the assumption of symmetrical adaptation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)681-695
Number of pages15
JournalAcademy of Management Journal
Volume47
Issue number5
StatePublished - Oct 2004

Fingerprint

Adaptability
Logic
Contingency theory
Simulation
Team working
Team performance
Structural change
Cognitive ability

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation
  • Strategy and Management
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)

Cite this

Moon, H., Hollenbeck, J. R., Humphrey, S. E., Ilgen, D. R., West, B., Ellis, A. P. J., & Porter, C. O. L. H. (2004). Asymmetric adaptability: Dynamic team structures as one-way streets. Academy of Management Journal, 47(5), 681-695.

Asymmetric adaptability : Dynamic team structures as one-way streets. / Moon, Henry; Hollenbeck, John R.; Humphrey, Stephen E.; Ilgen, Daniel R.; West, Bradley; Ellis, Aleksander P J; Porter, Christopher O L H.

In: Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 47, No. 5, 10.2004, p. 681-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Moon, H, Hollenbeck, JR, Humphrey, SE, Ilgen, DR, West, B, Ellis, APJ & Porter, COLH 2004, 'Asymmetric adaptability: Dynamic team structures as one-way streets', Academy of Management Journal, vol. 47, no. 5, pp. 681-695.
Moon H, Hollenbeck JR, Humphrey SE, Ilgen DR, West B, Ellis APJ et al. Asymmetric adaptability: Dynamic team structures as one-way streets. Academy of Management Journal. 2004 Oct;47(5):681-695.
Moon, Henry ; Hollenbeck, John R. ; Humphrey, Stephen E. ; Ilgen, Daniel R. ; West, Bradley ; Ellis, Aleksander P J ; Porter, Christopher O L H. / Asymmetric adaptability : Dynamic team structures as one-way streets. In: Academy of Management Journal. 2004 ; Vol. 47, No. 5. pp. 681-695.
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