Athletic heart syndrome

Joseph S Alpert, L. A. Pape, A. Ward, J. M. Rippe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regular exercise training results in a variety of cardiovascular adaptations including increases in left ventricular chamber size and wall thickness, and in resting vagal tone. These anatomic and physiologic changes may produce abnormalities in the ECG and echocardiogram. In the past, physicians often interpreted these changes as pathologic and advised cessation of training. But modern research has demonstrated that the cardiovascular changes are physiologic and are associated with preserved or enhanced cardiovascular function. It is important, however, to distinguish this physiologic hypertrophy from the pathologic hypertrophy of such conditions as obstructive cardiomyopathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)103-107
Number of pages5
JournalPhysician and Sportsmedicine
Volume17
Issue number7
StatePublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hypertrophy
Sports
Cardiomyopathies
Electrocardiography
Exercise
Physicians
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Alpert, J. S., Pape, L. A., Ward, A., & Rippe, J. M. (1989). Athletic heart syndrome. Physician and Sportsmedicine, 17(7), 103-107.

Athletic heart syndrome. / Alpert, Joseph S; Pape, L. A.; Ward, A.; Rippe, J. M.

In: Physician and Sportsmedicine, Vol. 17, No. 7, 1989, p. 103-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Alpert, JS, Pape, LA, Ward, A & Rippe, JM 1989, 'Athletic heart syndrome', Physician and Sportsmedicine, vol. 17, no. 7, pp. 103-107.
Alpert JS, Pape LA, Ward A, Rippe JM. Athletic heart syndrome. Physician and Sportsmedicine. 1989;17(7):103-107.
Alpert, Joseph S ; Pape, L. A. ; Ward, A. ; Rippe, J. M. / Athletic heart syndrome. In: Physician and Sportsmedicine. 1989 ; Vol. 17, No. 7. pp. 103-107.
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