Attentional and affective concomitants of meditation: A cross-sectional study

Richard J. Davidson, Daniel J. Goleman, Gary E. Schwartz

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Recent research has begun to systematically define a personality trait, moderately correlated with hypnotizability, which represents a disposition for having episodes of "total" attention, termed absorption (Roberts. Schuler, Bacon, Zimmerman, & Patterson, 1975; Shor, 1960; Shor, Orne, & O'Connell, 1962; Tellegen & Atkinson, 1974). Although attempts to modify hypnotizability have been only partially successful (see Diamond, 1974), with test-retest reliabilities over a 10-year span found to be.60 (Morgan, Johnson, & Hilgard, 1974), the plasticity of absorption has never been explored.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMeditation
Subtitle of host publicationClassic and Contemporary Perspectives
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages227-231
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781351506144
ISBN (Print)9780202362441
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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    Davidson, R. J., Goleman, D. J., & Schwartz, G. E. (2017). Attentional and affective concomitants of meditation: A cross-sectional study. In Meditation: Classic and Contemporary Perspectives (pp. 227-231). Taylor and Francis.