Attitudes toward a proposed reintroduction of mexican gray wolves in Arizona

Kathryn A. Schoenecker, William W Shaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A survey of telephone‐households was conducted in Greenlee County, Arizona, within and surrounding the potential reintroduction site for Mexican gray wolves. Interviews of 130 residents showed that 22% supported wolf reintroduction, 58% opposed reintroduction, and 20% of respondents were undecided. Concerns about livestock and hardships for ranchers were cited most often as reasons for opposing wolf reintroduction, with human safety concerns second. Over 50% of reintroduction supporters believe that Mexican wolves are integral to the ecosystem and belong in the wild, and more than 30% said wolves are native to the area and should be returned to Arizona. Of those who opposed wolf reintroduction, 48% said that wolf reintroduction would have no impact on their lifestyle or business, and 64% were not aware that wolves would be considered experimental‐nonessential, and would be removed or destroyed if they caused injury to humans or livestock.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)42-55
Number of pages14
JournalHuman Dimensions of Wildlife
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

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reintroduction
livestock
lifestyle
safety
ecosystem

Keywords

  • Arizona
  • Cants lupus baileyi
  • Human attitude
  • Mexican gray wolf
  • Reintroduction
  • Survey

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nature and Landscape Conservation
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law

Cite this

Attitudes toward a proposed reintroduction of mexican gray wolves in Arizona. / Schoenecker, Kathryn A.; Shaw, William W.

In: Human Dimensions of Wildlife, Vol. 2, No. 3, 1997, p. 42-55.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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