Attitudes toward lesbian, gay, and bisexual college students: The contribution of pluralistic ignorance, dynamic social impact, and contact theories

Anne Markey Bowen, Martin J. Bourgeois

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

79 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Social psychology theories may be useful in developing new interventions to reduce prejudice against lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) college students. For this preliminary study, the authors surveyed 109 college dormitory residents to determine their personal comfort with LGB students and their perceptions of other students' comfort with these individuals. They found widespread evidence of pluralistic ignorance - the students rated themselves as significantly less anti-gay than either their friends or the typical student. Students' attitudes showed geographic clustering, with the building of residence a significant predictor of students' attitudes. Finally, consistent with the contact hypothesis, the perception that 1 or 2 LGB students lived on the same floor or in the same building was associated with more positive attitudes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-96
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume50
Issue number2
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

social relations
Social Change
social effects
Students
student
Sexual Minorities
social psychology
Social Psychology
prejudice
contact
Cluster Analysis
resident

Keywords

  • Attitudes
  • Identity
  • Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students
  • Prejudice
  • Residence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Education

Cite this

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