Auditory intensity perception: Successive versus simultaneous, across- channel discriminations

Huanping Dai, D. M. Green

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study measures the ability of observers to compare the intensities of two stimuli occupying different frequency regions. It includes three experiments, each experiment having two conditions. In one condition, the two stimuli to be compared were presented simultaneously within each interval; this condition has been called profile analysis. In the other condition, the two stimuli were presented successively within each interval. Because the overall level of the stimuli was randomized between intervals, the observers were encouraged to compare the intensities of the two stimuli within each observation interval rather than between intervals. The stimuli were two simple tones in experiment 1 and two tonal complexes in both experiments 2 and 3. The stimuli used in experiments 2 and 3 differed in frequency. The results show that simultaneous comparisons are superior to successive comparisons. For simple tones, the difference in threshold is about 8 dB; for complexes with 10 to 11 components, the difference in threshold is about 15 dB. These differences can be explained by assuming that internal noises in different channels were partially correlated when stimuli in those channels were presented simultaneously and were independent when the stimuli were presented successively. Cancellation of the correlated noise is therefore possible with simultaneous comparisons, making such discrimination better than that achievable with successive comparisons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2845-2854
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1992
Externally publishedYes

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stimuli
discrimination
intervals
Stimulus
Discrimination
Hearing
thresholds
cancellation
Experiment
profiles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Auditory intensity perception : Successive versus simultaneous, across- channel discriminations. / Dai, Huanping; Green, D. M.

In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, Vol. 91, No. 5, 1992, p. 2845-2854.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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