Axillary and thoracic skin temperatures poorly comparable to core body temperature circadian rhythm

results from 2 adult populations.

Karen A. Thomas, Robert Burr, Shu Yuann Wang, Martha J. Lentz, Joan L Shaver

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Data from 2 separate studies were used to examine the relationships of axillary or thoracic skin temperature to rectal temperature and to determine the phase relationships of the circadian rhythms of these temperatures. In study 1, axillary skin and rectal temperatures were recorded in 19 healthy women, 21 to 36 years of age. In study 2, thoracic skin and rectal temperatures were recorded in 74 healthy women, 39 to 59 years of age. In both studies, temperatures were recorded continuously for 24 h while subjects carried out normal activities. Axillary and thoracic probes were insulated purposely to prevent ambient effects. Cosinor analysis was employed to estimate circadian rhythm mesor, amplitude, and acrophase. In addition, correlations between temperatures at various measurement sites were calculated and agreement determined. The circadian timing of axillary and skin temperature did not closely approximate that of rectal temperature: the mean acrophase (clock time) for study 1 was 18:57 h for axillary temperature and 16:12 h for rectal; for study 2, it was 03:05 h for thoracic and 15:05 h for rectal. Across individual subjects, the correlations of axillary or thoracic temperatures with rectal temperatures were variable. Results do not support the use of either axillary or skin temperature as a substitute for rectal temperature in circadian rhythm research related to adult women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)187-194
Number of pages8
JournalBiological Research for Nursing
Volume5
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 2004
Externally publishedYes

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Skin Temperature
Circadian Rhythm
Body Temperature
Thorax
Temperature
Population
Time and Motion Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Research and Theory

Cite this

Axillary and thoracic skin temperatures poorly comparable to core body temperature circadian rhythm : results from 2 adult populations. / Thomas, Karen A.; Burr, Robert; Wang, Shu Yuann; Lentz, Martha J.; Shaver, Joan L.

In: Biological Research for Nursing, Vol. 5, No. 3, 01.2004, p. 187-194.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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