Bardoxolone brings Nrf2-based therapies to light

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The targeted activation of nuclear factor erythroid-derived-2-like 2 (Nrf2) to alleviate symptoms of chronic kidney disease has recently garnered much attention. Unfortunately, the greatest clinical success to date, bardoxolone, failed in phase III clinical trial for unspecified safety reasons. The present letter to the editor discusses the clinical development of bardoxolone and explores potential reasons for the ultimate withdrawal from clinical trials. In particular, was the correct clinical indication pursued and would improved specificity have mitigated the safety concerns? Ultimately, it is concluded that the right clinical indication and heightened specificity will lead to successful Nrf2-based therapies. Therefore, the bardoxolone clinical results do not dampen enthusiasm for Nrf2-based therapies; rather it illuminates the clinical potential of the Nrf2 pathway as a drug target. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 517-518.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)517-518
Number of pages2
JournalAntioxidants and Redox Signaling
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 10 2013

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Safety
Light
Phase III Clinical Trials
Chronic Renal Insufficiency
Oxidation-Reduction
Chemical activation
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Molecular Biology
  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

Bardoxolone brings Nrf2-based therapies to light. / Zhang, Donna.

In: Antioxidants and Redox Signaling, Vol. 19, No. 5, 10.08.2013, p. 517-518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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