Baseline odor identification ability predicts degradation of psychomotor vigilance during 77 hours of sleep deprivation

William D.S. Killgore, Sharon A. McBride, Desiree B. Killgore, Thomas J. Balkin, Gary H. Kamimori

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Scores on the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test, a measure of the functional integrity of the orbitofrontal cortex, were used to predict the vulnerability to cognitive declines during 77 hr of sleep deprivation. Twenty-one healthy volunteers completed the Smell Identification Test at rested baseline followed by repeated psychomotor vigilance testing throughout each night. Participants with better smell identification abilities sustained faster speeds and fewer lapses on the second and third nights of sleep deprivation than participants with lower scores. Individual differences in trait-like functioning of the orbitofrontal cortex are predictive of the ability to sustain alertness and vigilance during continuous wakefulness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1207-1225
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Neuroscience
Volume118
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Attention
  • Odor identification
  • Olfaction
  • Psychomotor vigilance
  • Sleep deprivation
  • Smell Identification Test

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

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