Baseline sleep quality is a significant predictor of quit-day smoking self-efficacy among low-income treatment-seeking smokers

Uma S. Nair, Patricia L Haynes, Bradley N. Collins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Compared to non-smokers, smokers have an increased risk for poor sleep quality, which could undermine confidence to quit. This study examined whether baseline sleep quality was associated with quit-day smoking self-efficacy among smokers enrolled in a smoking cessation trial. Treatment-seeking low-income smokers were randomized to either a low-intensity physical activity integrated with standard smoking cessation intervention or standard care cessation only. Poor sleep quality was significantly associated with lower quit-day (week 4) smoking self-efficacy (β = –0.61; standard error = 8.1; p =.03). Over half the samples (53%) reported poor sleep quality, thus addressing baseline sleep quality is an important consideration in smoking cessation programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 1 2017

Keywords

  • health promotion
  • nicotine dependence
  • self-efficacy
  • sleep
  • smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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