Behavioral subtypes of low-achieving children: Differences in school social adjustment

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to identify possible behavioral subtypes of low- achieving elementary school children and to examine the extent to which these children experience difficulties in their peer relationships in school. Thirty-three low- achieving second- through fifth-grade students and a matched sample of average- achieving children were identified. A cluster analysis was conducted using peer assessment measures of cooperative, disruptive, aggressive, and shy behavior. Results revealed two distinct subtypes of low-achieving children, an aggressive-disruptive group and a nonaggressive but somewhat shy group. Low-achieving, aggressive-disruptive children were less socially accepted and more rejected than average-achieving children. These children were also rated by teachers as having more difficulty handling problematic social situations than either average-achieving children or low-achieving, nonaggressive children. Low-achieving, nonaggressive children did not differ from average-achieving children in peer sociometric status or in their ability to handle social problem situations. Implications for social skills intervention are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)487-498
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Social Adjustment
social adjustment
school
social problem
social situation
Aptitude
Social Problems
cluster analysis
schoolchild
elementary school
Cluster Analysis
Group

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of this research was to identify possible behavioral subtypes of low- achieving elementary school children and to examine the extent to which these children experience difficulties in their peer relationships in school. Thirty-three low- achieving second- through fifth-grade students and a matched sample of average- achieving children were identified. A cluster analysis was conducted using peer assessment measures of cooperative, disruptive, aggressive, and shy behavior. Results revealed two distinct subtypes of low-achieving children, an aggressive-disruptive group and a nonaggressive but somewhat shy group. Low-achieving, aggressive-disruptive children were less socially accepted and more rejected than average-achieving children. These children were also rated by teachers as having more difficulty handling problematic social situations than either average-achieving children or low-achieving, nonaggressive children. Low-achieving, nonaggressive children did not differ from average-achieving children in peer sociometric status or in their ability to handle social problem situations. Implications for social skills intervention are discussed.",
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